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Climate Preferences, Obesity, and Unobserved Heterogeneity in Cities

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Listed:
  • Anthony M Yezer

    (George Washington University)

  • Stephen J Popick

    (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation)

Abstract

Some sources of heterogeneity among cities, i.e. age, gender, race, income, and education, have been the object of substantial inquiry. The reasons are obvious. These differences are easily observed and may have important implications for economic activity. This study considers another potentially important population characteristic, obesity. Descriptive statistics reveal that the intercity variance in obesity rates is substantial. Empirical results demonstrate that demographic and regional amenity variables all help to explain intercity differences in obesity. Because obesity is important for climate preferences, health, and productivity, its omission from previous studies and its correlation with amenity and demographic characteristics could create problems for empirical research.

Suggested Citation

  • Anthony M Yezer & Stephen J Popick, 2017. "Climate Preferences, Obesity, and Unobserved Heterogeneity in Cities," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 47(3), pages 309-329, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v47:y:2017:i:3:p:309-329
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    location; obesity; climate preferences; unobserved heterogeneity in cities;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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