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Catch me if you can. Can human observers identify insiders in asset markets?

Author

Listed:
  • Thomas Stöckl

    (Department Business Administration Online, Management Center Innsbruck)

  • Stefan Palan

    (Department of Banking and Finance, University of Graz)

Abstract

Securities regulators around the globe face the challenge of identifying trades based on inside information. We study human observers' ability to identify informed traders and investigate which trading patterns are indicative of informed trading using experimental asset markets. We furthermore test how the behavioral response of informed traders to the threat of detection and punishment impacts observers' detection abilities. We find that market trading data carries information which correlates with informed trading activity. Observers partly succeed in recognizing and using this information to identify in-formed traders.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Stöckl & Stefan Palan, 2018. "Catch me if you can. Can human observers identify insiders in asset markets?," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2018-01, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.
  • Handle: RePEc:grz:wpsses:2018-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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