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Off-Floor Trading, Disintegration, and the Bid-Ask Spread in Experimental Markets

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  • Campbell, Joseph, et al

Abstract

This article uses experimental methods to establish that greater uncertainty in the environment increases the naturally emerging bid-ask spread in double-auction trading. The opportunity to trade off floor is then introduced. Off-floor trading is greater in the environment with a wider bid-ask spread, increases with block trading, and increases still more with increasing subject experience. Finally, the authors find that the preponderance of off-floor trades are inside the bid-ask spread, supporting the hypothesis that a motive for such trades is to split privately the gain represented by the bid-ask spread without revealing publicly a willingness to make price concessions. Coauthors are Shawn LaMaster, Vernon L. Smith, and Mark Van Boening. Copyright 1991 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Campbell, Joseph, et al, 1991. "Off-Floor Trading, Disintegration, and the Bid-Ask Spread in Experimental Markets," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(4), pages 495-522, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jnlbus:v:64:y:1991:i:4:p:495-522
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marco Pagano, 1989. "Endogenous Market Thinness and Stock Price Volatility," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(2), pages 269-287.
    2. Robert J. Shiller, 1984. "Stock Prices and Social Dynamics," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 15(2), pages 457-510.
    3. De Long, J Bradford & Andrei Shleifer & Lawrence H. Summers & Robert J. Waldmann, 1990. "Noise Trader Risk in Financial Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(4), pages 703-738, August.
    4. John Y. Campbell & Albert S. Kyle, 1993. "Smart Money, Noise Trading and Stock Price Behaviour," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 1-34.
    5. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-1335, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kugler, Tamar & Neeman, Zvika & Vulkan, Nir, 2006. "Markets versus negotiations: An experimental investigation," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 121-134, July.
    2. Ladley, Dan & Schenk-Hoppé, Klaus Reiner, 2009. "Do stylised facts of order book markets need strategic behaviour?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, pages 817-831.
    3. Jean Paul Rabanal & Olga A. Rabanal, 2015. "A Simulation on the Evolution of Markets: Call Market, Decentralized and Posted Offer," Working Papers 2015-34, Peruvian Economic Association.
    4. Blennerhassett, Michael & Bowman, Robert G., 1998. "A change in market microstructure: the switch to electronic screen trading on the New Zealand stock exchange," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 8(3-4), pages 261-276, December.
    5. Ledenyov, Dimitri O. & Ledenyov, Viktor O., 2015. "Wave function method to forecast foreign currencies exchange rates at ultra high frequency electronic trading in foreign currencies exchange markets," MPRA Paper 67470, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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