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Public Policies for Households Recycling when Reputation Matters

Author

Listed:
  • Ankinée Kirakozian

    () (University of Nice Sophia Antipolis
    GREDEG CNRS)

  • Christophe Charlier

    (University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, France
    GREDEG CNRS)

Abstract

An important strand in the economic literature focuses on how to provide the right incentives for households to recycle their waste. A growing number of studies, inspired by psychology, seeks to explain waste sorting and pro-environmental behavior, and highlights the importance of social approval and the peer effect. The present theoretical work explores these issues. We propose a model that considers heterogeneous households that choose to recycle, based on three main household characteristics: their environmental preferences, the opportunity costs of their tax expenditure, and their reputation. The model is original in depicting the interactions among households, which enable them to form beliefs about social recycling norm allowing them to assess their reputation. These interactions are explored through Agent-based simulations. We highlight how individual recycling decisions depend on these interactions and how the effectiveness of public policies related to recycling is affected by a crowding-out effect. The model simulations consider three complementary policies: provision of incentives to recycle through taxation; provision of information on the importance of selective sorting; and an ‘individualized’ approach that takes the form of a ‘nudge’ using social comparison. Interestingly, the results regarding these policies emerging from households interactions at the aggregate level cannot be fully predicted from “isolated” individual recycling decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ankinée Kirakozian & Christophe Charlier, 2015. "Public Policies for Households Recycling when Reputation Matters," GREDEG Working Papers 2015-20, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, revised Nov 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:gre:wpaper:2015-20
    as

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    File URL: http://www.gredeg.cnrs.fr/working-papers/GREDEG-WP-2015-20.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, November 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kjell Arne Brekke & Gorm Kipperberg & Karine Nyborg, 2010. "Social Interaction in Responsibility Ascription: The Case of Household Recycling," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 86(4), pages 766-784.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household recycling; Waste; Environmental regulation; Behavioral economics; ABM; Social interaction;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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