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Standard vs random dictator games. The effect of role uncertainty on generosity

Author

Listed:
  • Ernesto Mesa-Vázquez

    (University of Valencia & ERICES.)

  • Ismael Rodriguez-Lara

    (Department of Economic Theory and Economic History, University of Granada.)

  • Amparo Urbano

    (University of Valencia & ERICES.)

Abstract

Using a multiple-price list dictator game, this paper provides experimental evidence that the level of generosity is affected when we vary the probability that the dictator’s decision will be implemented. We also show that framing matters for generosity in that subjects are less generous when their choices under role uncertainty are such that subjects perceive that they are in the role of dictators and know that their choices will be implemented with a certain probability, compared with a setting in which subjects are told that they are in the role of recipients and know that their choices will not be implemented with certain probability.

Suggested Citation

  • Ernesto Mesa-Vázquez & Ismael Rodriguez-Lara & Amparo Urbano, 2019. "Standard vs random dictator games. The effect of role uncertainty on generosity," ThE Papers 20/05, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
  • Handle: RePEc:gra:wpaper:20/05
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ugr.es/~teoriahe/RePEc/gra/wpaper/thepapers20_05.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Walkowitz, Gari, 2021. "Dictator game variants with probabilistic (and cost-saving) payoffs: A systematic test," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 85(C).
    2. Mesa-Vázquez, Ernesto & Rodriguez-Lara, Ismael & Urbano, Amparo, 2021. "Standard vs random dictator games: On the effects of role uncertainty and framing on generosity," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 206(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    dictator games; generosity; role uncertainty; framing effects.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D3 - Microeconomics - - Distribution
    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty

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