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Revisiting Gender Differences in Ultimatum Bargaining: Experimental Evidence from the US and China

Author

Listed:
  • Shuwen Li

    () (Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science and Department of Economics, George Mason University)

  • Xiandong Qin

    () (Department of Applied Economics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

  • Daniel Houser

    () (Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science and Department of Economics, George Mason University)

Abstract

We report results from a replication of Solnick (2001), which finds using an ultimatum game that, in relation to males, more is demanded from female proposers and less is offered to female responders. We conduct Solnick’s (2001) game using participants from a large US university and a large Chinese university. We find little evidence of gender differences across proposer and responder decisions in both locations. We do however find that, in comparison to Chinese participants, US proposers are more generous, while US responders are more demanding.

Suggested Citation

  • Shuwen Li & Xiandong Qin & Daniel Houser, 2017. "Revisiting Gender Differences in Ultimatum Bargaining: Experimental Evidence from the US and China," Working Papers 1064, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:gms:wpaper:1064
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Revisiting Gender Differences in Ultimatum Bargaining: Experimental Evidence from the US and China
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-05-17 20:00:29

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    Cited by:

    1. Chew, Soo Hong & Huang, Wei & Li, Xun, 2021. "Does haze cloud decision making? A natural laboratory experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 182(C), pages 132-161.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender differences; cultural differences; laboratory experiment; ultimatum game; bargaining;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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