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Revisiting gender differences in ultimatum bargaining: experimental evidence from the US and China

Author

Listed:
  • Shuwen Li

    () (University of North Carolina at Charlotte)

  • Xiangdong Qin

    (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

  • Daniel Houser

    (George Mason University)

Abstract

Abstract We report results from a replication of Solnick (Econ Inq 39(2):189, 2001), which finds using an ultimatum game that, in relation to males, more is demanded from female proposers and less is offered to female responders. We conduct Solnick’s (2001) game using participants from a large US university and a large Chinese university. We find little evidence of gender differences across proposer and responder decisions in both locations.

Suggested Citation

  • Shuwen Li & Xiangdong Qin & Daniel Houser, 2018. "Revisiting gender differences in ultimatum bargaining: experimental evidence from the US and China," Journal of the Economic Science Association, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 4(2), pages 180-190, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jesaex:v:4:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s40881-018-0054-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s40881-018-0054-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Matthias Sutter & Ronald Bosman & Martin Kocher & Frans Winden, 2009. "Gender pairing and bargaining—Beware the same sex!," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 12(3), pages 318-331, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender differences; Cultural differences; Laboratory experiment; Ultimatum game; Bargaining;

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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