IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Beyond "Manucentrism" - Some Fresh Facts about Job and Worker Flows

  • Bingley, P.
  • Eriksson, T.
  • Werwatz, A.
  • Westergard-Nielsen, N.

This paper gives a comprehensive picture of job and worker flows for the entire Danish economy. We exploit a unique central administrative register encompassing all employees of all establishments across all sectors throughout two business cycles. This enables us to broaden the focus of the previous literature about job and worker flows which has been concerned exclusively with larger establishments, especially in the manufacturing sector. We find that manufacturing has fewer flows than most other private sector industries. This is largely due to the importance of small establishments in the job and worker reallocation processes. Davis and Haltiwanger find job and worker flows to be respectively counter- and pro-cyclical. This is confirmed for Danish manufacturing and the public sector, but not for the private sector. Manufacturing flows are representative of the Danish economy as a whole only because of the large public sector.

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Paper provided by Centre for Labour Market and Social Research, Danmark- in its series Papers with number 99-09.

as
in new window

Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:clmsre:99-09
Contact details of provider: Postal: Danmark; Centre for Labour Market and Social Research. Science Park Aarhus Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C, Danmark
Phone: +45 8942 2350
Fax: +45 8942 2365
Web page: http://www.cls.dk/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Steve J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1991. "Gross Job Creation, Gross Job Destruction and Employment Reallocation," NBER Working Papers 3728, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Christopher L. Foote, 1998. "Trend Employment Growth And The Bunching Of Job Creation And Destruction," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 113(3), pages 809-834, August.
  3. John M. Abowd & Patrick Corbel & Francis Kramarz, 1999. "The Entry And Exit Of Workers And The Growth Of Employment: An Analysis Of French Establishments," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(2), pages 170-187, May.
  4. Boeri, Tito, 1996. "Is Job Turnover Countercyclical?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(4), pages 603-25, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:clmsre:99-09. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.