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Aligning public expenditure for agricultural development priorities under rapid transformation: The case of China:

Author

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  • Yu, Bingxin
  • Chen, Kevin Z.
  • Zhang, Haisen

Abstract

This paper provides a comprehensive review of agricultural policy and public agricultural expenditure (PAE) in China. China shifted away from taxing agriculture to supporting agriculture in the mid-2000s, but the sector faces mounting demographic, biophysical, and trade challenges. PAE in China is outpacing that of other developing economies in Asia, but its composition does not align perfectly with the development challenges and priorities the sector faces.

Suggested Citation

  • Yu, Bingxin & Chen, Kevin Z. & Zhang, Haisen, 2014. "Aligning public expenditure for agricultural development priorities under rapid transformation: The case of China:," IFPRI discussion papers 1397, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1397
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Shenggen Fan & Connie Chan‐Kang & Keming Qian & K. Krishnaiah, 2005. "National and international agricultural research and rural poverty: the case of rice research in India and China," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(s3), pages 369-379, November.
    2. Shenggen Fan & Xiaobo Zhang, 2008. "Public Expenditure, Growth and Poverty Reduction in Rural Uganda," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 20(3), pages 466-496.
    3. Wusheng Yu & Hans G. Jensen, 2010. "China’s Agricultural Policy Transition: Impacts of Recent Reforms and Future Scenarios," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 343-368, June.
    4. World Bank, . "China : Public Services for Building the New Socialist Countryside," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 7665, September.
    5. Alejandro Nin-Pratt & Bingxin Yu & Shenggen Fan, 2010. "Comparisons of agricultural productivity growth in China and India," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 209-223, June.
    6. Fan, Shenggen (ed.), 2008. "Public expenditures, growth, and poverty: Lessons from developing countries," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-8018-8859-5.
    7. Zhang, Xiaobo & Fan, Shenggen, 2004. "Public investment and regional inequality in rural China," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 30(2), pages 89-100, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural research; Agriculture; public expenditure; Food safety; Environment; Poverty; Agricultural policies; Economic development; agricultural sector; composition; inequality;
    All these keywords.

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