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Household perception and demand for better protection of land rights in Ethiopia:

Listed author(s):
  • Ghebru, Hosaena
  • Koru, Bethlehem
  • Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum

The study assesses factors that explain households’ perceived tenure insecurity and the demand for new formalization of land rights in Ethiopia. We use data from the 2013 Agricultural Growth Program (AGP) survey of 7,500 households from high agricultural potential areas of Ethiopia. The results from a logistic estimation and a descriptive analysis reveal that the de-mand for further land demarcation is positively associated with higher perception of tenure insecurity. Moreover, disaggre-gated regression results indicate that ownership and boundary-related disputes characterize peri-urban locations and vibrant communities, whereas perceived risk of government expropriation of land is mainly manifested in predominantly rural com-munities and areas where administrative land redistribution is a recent practices. Hence, the rollout strategy for the recent wave of the Second-Level Land Certification agenda should avoid a blanket approach, as it can only be considered a best fit for those vibrant and peri-urban locations where demand for further formalization is higher and boundary and ownership-related disputes are more common. However, focusing similar interventions in predominantly agrarian communities and communities with recent administrative land distributions may not be advisable since expropriation risk seems to be dictating perceived tenure insecurity of households in such locations. Rather, regulatory reforms in the form of strengthening the depth of rights over land, such as formalization of rural land lease markets and abolishing conditional restrictions on inter-generational land transfers via inheritance or gifting, could be considered as alternative and cost-effective intervention pack-ages in this latter context.

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series ESSP working papers with number 83.

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Date of creation: 2016
Handle: RePEc:fpr:esspwp:83
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  1. Deininger, Klaus & Ali, Daniel Ayalew & Holden, Stein & Zevenbergen, Jaap, 2008. "Rural Land Certification in Ethiopia: Process, Initial Impact, and Implications for Other African Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 1786-1812, October.
  2. Ghebru, Hosaena & Holden, Stein, 2013. "Links between Tenure Security and Food Security: Evidence from Ethiopia," CLTS Working Papers 2/13, Centre for Land Tenure Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
  3. Deininger, Klaus & Castagnini, Raffaella, 2006. "Incidence and impact of land conflict in Uganda," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 321-345, July.
  4. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2000. "Land Reform, Poverty Reduction, and Growth: Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 389-430.
  5. Mintewab Bezabih & Andrea Mannberg & Eyerusalem Siba, 2014. "The land certification program and off-farm employment in Ethiopia," GRI Working Papers 168, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  6. Andre, Catherine & Platteau, Jean-Philippe, 1998. "Land relations under unbearable stress: Rwanda caught in the Malthusian trap," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 1-47, January.
  7. Migot-Adholla, Shem, et al, 1991. "Indigenous Land Rights Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Constraint on Productivity?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 5(1), pages 155-175, January.
  8. Klaus Deininger & Daniel Ayalew Ali & Tekie Alemu, 2011. "Impacts of Land Certification on Tenure Security, Investment, and Land Market Participation: Evidence from Ethiopia," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(2), pages 312-334.
  9. Klaus Deininger, 2003. "Land Markets in Developing and Transition Economies: Impact of Liberalization and Implications for Future Reform," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1217-1222.
  10. Besley, Timothy, 1995. "Property Rights and Investment Incentives: Theory and Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 903-937, October.
  11. Stein Holden & Klaus Deininger & Hosaena Ghebru, 2011. "Tenure Insecurity, Gender, Low-cost Land Certification and Land Rental Market Participation in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 31-47.
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