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German unification: what have we learned from multi-country models?

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  • Joseph E. Gagnon
  • Paul R. Masson
  • Warwick J. McKibbin

Abstract

This study reports on early simulations of the effects of German unification using three different rational-expectations multi-country models. Despite significant differences in their structures and in the implementations of the unification shock, the models delivered a number of common results that proved to be a reasonably accurate guide to the direction and magnitude of the effects of unification on most key macroeconomic variables. In particular, unification was expected to give rise to an increase in German aggregate demand that would put upward pressure on output, inflation, and the exchange rate, and downward pressure on the current account balance in Germany. The model simulations also highlighted the contractionary effects of high German interest rates on other member countries of the Exchange Rate Mechanism of the European Monetary System.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph E. Gagnon & Paul R. Masson & Warwick J. McKibbin, 1996. "German unification: what have we learned from multi-country models?," International Finance Discussion Papers 547, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:547
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wyplosz, Charles, 1991. "A Note on the Real Exchange Rate Effect of German Unification," CEPR Discussion Papers 527, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Lewis S. Alexander & Joseph E. Gagnon, 1990. "The global economic implications of German unification," International Finance Discussion Papers 379, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Charles Wyplosz, 1991. "On the real exchange rate effect of German unification," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 127(1), pages 1-17, March.
    4. Mckibbin, W.J., 1990. "Some Global Macroeconomic Implications Of German Unification," Papers 81, Brookings Institution - Working Papers.
    5. Hall, Stephen G, 1993. "Modelling Structural Change Using the Kalman Filter," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 1-13.
    6. Adams, Gwyn & Alexander, Lewis & Gagnon, Joseph, 1993. "German unification and the European Monetary System: A quantitative analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 353-392, August.
    7. Joseph E. Gagnon, 1989. "A forward-looking multicountry model: MX3," International Finance Discussion Papers 359, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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    Cited by:

    1. John FitzGerald & Adele Bergin, 2004. "The Stability and Growth Pact: How much Co-ordination?," Papers WP153, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    2. Bayoumi, Tamim & Coe, David T. & Helpman, Elhanan, 1999. "R&D spillovers and global growth," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 399-428, April.
    3. Beck, Martin & Winker, Peter, 2004. "Modeling spillovers and feedback of international trade in a disequilibrium framework," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 445-470, May.
    4. Robert Brooks & Robert Faff & David Sokulsky, 2005. "The stock market impact of German reunification: international evidence," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 31-42.
    5. McKibbin, Warwick J. & Wilcoxen, Peter J., 2013. "A Global Approach to Energy and the Environment," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.

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    Keywords

    Germany ; Interest rates;

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