IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedgfe/2014-110.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Central banks as lender of last resort: experiences during the 2007-2010 crisis and lessons for the future

Author

Listed:
  • Dietrich Domanski
  • Richhild Moessner
  • William R. Nelson

Abstract

During the 2007-2010 financial crisis, central banks accumulated a vast amount of experience in acting as lender of last resort. This paper reviews the various ways that central banks provided emergency liquidity assistance (ELA) during the crisis, and discusses issues for the design of ELA arising from that experience. In a number of ways, the emergency liquidity assistance since 2007 has largely adhered to Bagehot's dictums of lending freely against good collateral to solvent institutions at a penalty rate. But there were many exceptions to these rules. Those exceptions illuminate the situations where the lender of last resort role of central banks is most difficult. They also highlight key challenges in designing lender of last resort policies going forward.

Suggested Citation

  • Dietrich Domanski & Richhild Moessner & William R. Nelson, 2014. "Central banks as lender of last resort: experiences during the 2007-2010 crisis and lessons for the future," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-110, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2014-110
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/feds/2014/files/2014110pap.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. William Allen & Richhild Moessner, 2010. "Central bank co-operation and international liquidity in the financial crisis of 2008-9," BIS Working Papers 310, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. Patrick McGuire & Goetz von Peter, 2012. "The Dollar Shortage in Global Banking and the International Policy Response," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 155-178, June.
    3. Marvin Goodfriend & Robert G. King, 1988. "Financial deregulation, monetary policy, and central banking," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, vol. 74(May), pages 3-22.
    4. Richhild Moessner & William A Allen, 2010. "Banking crises and the international monetary system in the Great Depression and now," BIS Working Papers 333, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Cheun, Samuel & von Köppen-Mertes, Isabel & Weller, Benedict, 2009. "The collateral frameworks of the Eurosystem, the Federal Reserve System and the Bank of England and the financial market turmoil," Occasional Paper Series 107, European Central Bank.
    6. Patrick McGuire & Goetz von Peter, 2009. "The US dollar shortage in global banking," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    7. Philippine Cour-Thimann & Bernhard Winkler, 2012. "The ECB’s non-standard monetary policy measures: the role of institutional factors and financial structure," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(4), pages 765-803, WINTER.
    8. William A. Allen & Richhild Moessner, 2010. "Central Bank co-operation and International liquidity in the financial crisis of 2008-09," FMG Special Papers sp187, Financial Markets Group.
    9. Richhild Moessner & William A Allen, 2010. "Options for meeting the demand for international liquidity during financial crises," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, September.
    10. Claudio Borio & William Nelson, 2008. "Monetary operations and the financial turmoil," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    11. Samuel Cheun & Isabel von Köppen-Mertes & Benedict Weller, 2009. "The collateral frameworks of the Eurosystem, the Federal Reserve System and the Bank of England and the financial market turmoil," Occasional Paper Series 107, European Central Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Donato Masciandaro & Davide Romelli, 2017. "Twin Peaks And Central Banks: Economics, Political Economy And Comparative Analysis," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1768, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    2. Marcin Jerzy Michalski & Michael Bowe & Olga Kolokolova, 2016. "Systemic risk, interbank market contagion, and the lender of last resort function," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Combining micro and macro data for financial stability analysis, volume 41, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Mark A. Carlson & Burcu Duygan-Bump & William R. Nelson, 2015. "Why Do We Need Both Liquidity Regulations and a Lender of Last Resort? A Perspective from Federal Reserve Lending during the 2007-09 U.S. Financial Crisis," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Jakob Korbinian Eberl, 2016. "The Collateral Framework of the Eurosystem and Its Fiscal Implications," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 69, May.
    5. Bank for International Settlements, 2015. "Central bank operating frameworks and collateral markets," CGFS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 53, June.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Dietrich Domanski & Richhild Moessner & William Nelson, 2014. "Central banks as lenders of last resort: experiences during the 2007-10 crisis and lessons for the future," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Re-thinking the lender of last resort, volume 79, pages 43-75, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. christiaan Pattipeilohy, 2016. "A comparative analysis of developments in central bank balance sheet composition," BIS Working Papers 559, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Elena Seghezza, 2018. "Can swap line arrangements help solve the Triffin dilemma? How?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(10), pages 2691-2708, October.
    4. M. Vari, 2014. "Implementing monetary policy in a fragmented monetary union," Working papers 529, Banque de France.
    5. Dietrich Domanski & Philip Turner, 2011. "The Great Liquidity Freeze : What Does It Mean for International Banking?," Finance Working Papers 23245, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    6. Jakob Korbinian Eberl, 2016. "The Collateral Framework of the Eurosystem and Its Fiscal Implications," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 69, May.
    7. Moessner, Richhild & Allen, William A., 2013. "Central bank swap line effectiveness during the euro area sovereign debt crisis," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 167-178.
    8. Claudia Buch & Catherine Koch & Michael Koetter, 2016. "Crises and rescues: liquidity transmission through international banks," BIS Working Papers 576, Bank for International Settlements.
    9. Michael D. Bordo & Owen F. Humpage & Anna J. Schwartz, 2015. "Epilogue: Foreign-Exchange-Market Operations in the Twenty-First Century," NBER Chapters, in: Strained Relations: U.S. Foreign-Exchange Operations and Monetary Policy in the Twentieth Century, pages 345-363, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Bernanke, B.S., 2011. "International capital flows and the returns to safe assets in the United States 2003-2007," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 15, pages 13-26, February.
    11. Carmela D'Avino, 2015. "Net Interoffice Accounts of Global Banks: The Role of Domestic Funding," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(3), pages 1-17, June.
    12. Galariotis, Emilios C. & Makrichoriti, Panagiota & Spyrou, Spyros, 2016. "Sovereign CDS spread determinants and spill-over effects during financial crisis: A panel VAR approach," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 62-77.
    13. Maylis Avaro & Henri Sterdyniak, 2014. "Banking union: a solution to the euro zone crisis?," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(1), pages 193-241.
    14. Bruno, Valentina & Shin, Hyun Song, 2015. "Capital flows and the risk-taking channel of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 119-132.
    15. Bertrand Blancheton & Christian Bordes & Samuel Maveyraud & Philippe Rous, 2012. "Risk of liquidity and contagion of the crisis on the US, UK and Euro Zone money markets," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01098954, HAL.
    16. Robert N McCauley, 2018. "The 2008 crisis: transpacific or transatlantic?," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    17. Tommaso Trani, 2011. "Trade in secured debt, adjustment in haircuts and international portfolios," IHEID Working Papers 13-2011, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    18. Eugenio Cerutti & Stijn Claessens, 2017. "The Great Cross-Border Bank Deleveraging: Supply Constraints and Intra-Group Frictions," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 21(1), pages 201-236.
    19. Cetorelli, Nicola & Goldberg, Linda S., 2012. "Liquidity management of U.S. global banks: Internal capital markets in the great recession," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 299-311.
    20. Bouvatier, Vincent & Delatte, Anne-Laure, 2015. "Waves of international banking integration: A tale of regional differences," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 354-373.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banking crisis; central bank liquidity; lender of last resort;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2014-110. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.