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Let's Make a Deal - the Impact of Social Security Provisions and Firm Liabilities on Early Retirement

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  • Hakola, Tuulia
  • Uusitalo, Roope

Abstract

Literature on early retirement has generally ignored firms' role in the labour market withdrawals. Yet, as it is shown in this paper, employee incentives alone cannot explain the increase in unemployment at the end of the career. Instead, we construct an implicit contracts model where we account for both the firm and the worker incentives. Displacements occur only when joint utility of the two parties are greater for displacement than for continued employment. We use a firm-worker -panel to test two implications of our model. First, we find that firms target their layoffs on employees who lose least when displaced. This targeting is more frequent in firms in financial distress and during a recession. Second, we find that a change in a disability risk affects also the displacement probability. This is due to differences in experience rating for the disability and unemployment pensions.

Suggested Citation

  • Hakola, Tuulia & Uusitalo, Roope, 2001. "Let's Make a Deal - the Impact of Social Security Provisions and Firm Liabilities on Early Retirement," Discussion Papers 260, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:fer:dpaper:260
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Topel, Robert H, 1984. "Experience Rating of Unemployment Insurance and the Incidence of Unemployment," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 61-90, April.
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    4. Lumsdaine, Robin L. & Mitchell, Olivia S., 1999. "New developments in the economic analysis of retirement," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 49, pages 3261-3307, Elsevier.
    5. Hall, Robert E & Lazear, Edward P, 1984. "The Excess Sensitivity of Layoffs and Quits to Demand," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(2), pages 233-257, April.
    6. Feldstein, Martin S, 1978. "The Effect of Unemployment Insurance on Temporary Layoff Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(5), pages 834-846, December.
    7. Pablo Antolín & Stefano Scarpetta, 1998. "Microeconometric Analysis of the Retirement Decision: Germany," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 204, OECD Publishing.
    8. Hutchens, Robert, 1999. "Social Security Benefits and Employer Behavior: Evaluating Social Security Early Retirement Benefits as a Form of Unemployment Insurance," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 659-678, August.
    9. Hakola, Tuulia, 2000. "Navigating through the Finnish Pension System," Discussion Papers 224, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    10. Feldstein, Martin S, 1976. "Temporary Layoffs in the Theory of Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(5), pages 937-957, October.
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    12. Maarten Lindeboom, 1998. "Microeconometric Analysis of the Retirement Decision: The Netherlands," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 207, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kyyrä, Tomi & Wilke, Ralf A., 2006. "Reduction in the Long-Term Unemployment of the Elderly: A Success Story from Finland Revised," Discussion Papers 396, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    2. International Monetary Fund, 2007. "Finland: Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 2007/278, International Monetary Fund.

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