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An Empirical Contribution to the Debate on Corruption,Democracy and Environmental Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Lorenzo Pellegrini

    (Vrije Universiteit)

  • Reyer Gerlagh

    (Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM-FALW), Vrije Universiteit)

Abstract

Both theoretical and empirical studies have shown that democracy and corruption have substantial influence on environmental policy. In this paper, we empirically analyse whether both democracy and corruption are equally important determinants. When these variables are jointly included as explanatory variables, we find that corruption stands out as an important determinant of environmental policies, while democracy has a very limited impact. Further on, we discuss our results in the context of the Environmental Kuznets Curve literature. We argue that institutional disarray that plagues developing countries will make it problematic for them to have increasing environmental policy stringency combined with increasing incomes. Finally, and more optimistically, when we consider our results in the context of institutions and growth, we conclude that there is a possibility of reaching a double dividend. Reductions in corruption would induce both higher growth rates and stricter environmental policies. Thus, institutional improvement is an extremely valuable step in achieving sustainable development.

Suggested Citation

  • Lorenzo Pellegrini & Reyer Gerlagh, 2005. "An Empirical Contribution to the Debate on Corruption,Democracy and Environmental Policy," Working Papers 2005.8, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2005.8
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    File URL: http://www.feem.it/userfiles/attach/Publication/NDL2005/NDL2005-008.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin C. McGuire & Mancur Olson Jr., 1996. "The Economics of Autocracy and Majority Rule: The Invisible Hand and the Use of Force," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 72-96, March.
    2. Stern, David I., 2004. "The Rise and Fall of the Environmental Kuznets Curve," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1419-1439, August.
    3. Lorenzo Pellegrini & Reyer Gerlagh, 2004. "Corruption's Effect on Growth and its Transmission Channels," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(3), pages 429-456, August.
    4. Barro, Robert J, 1996. "Democracy and Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-27, March.
    5. Gene M. Grossman & Alan B. Krueger, 1995. "Economic Growth and the Environment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(2), pages 353-377.
    6. Eliste, Paavo & Fredriksson, Per G., 2002. "Environmental Regulations, Transfers, and Trade: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 234-250, March.
    7. Treisman, Daniel, 2000. "The causes of corruption: a cross-national study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 399-457, June.
    8. Damania, Richard, 2002. "Environmental controls with corrupt bureaucrats," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(03), pages 407-427, July.
    9. Fredriksson, Per G. & List, John A. & Millimet, Daniel L., 2003. "Bureaucratic corruption, environmental policy and inbound US FDI: theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(7-8), pages 1407-1430, August.
    10. William T. Harbaugh & Arik Levinson & David Molloy Wilson, 2002. "Reexamining The Empirical Evidence For An Environmental Kuznets Curve," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 541-551.
    11. Susmita Dasgupta & Ashoka Mody & Subhendu Roy & David Wheeler, 2001. "Environmental Regulation and Development: A Cross-country Empirical Analysis," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 173-187.
    12. Mauro, Paolo, 1998. "Corruption and the composition of government expenditure," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 263-279, June.
    13. Paolo Mauro, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nepal, Rabindra & Tisdell, Clem & Jamasb, Tooraj, 2017. "Economic Reforms and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in European and Central Asian Transition Economies," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 253076, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    2. Lorenzo Pellegrini & Reyer Gerlagh, 2005. "Are EU Environmental Policies Too Demanding for New Members States?," Working Papers 2005.46, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    3. Nepal, Rabindra & Jamasb, Tooraj & Tisdell, Clement Allan, 2017. "On environmental impacts of market-based reforms: Evidence from the European and Central Asian transition economies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 44-52.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption; Democracy; Development; Environmental policy; Institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • H40 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - General
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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