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Field experiments on the development of time preferences

Author

Listed:
  • James Andreoni
  • Michael Kuhn
  • John List
  • Anya Samek
  • Charles Sprenger

Abstract

Time preferences have been correlated with a range of life outcomes, yet little is known about their early development. We conduct a field experiment to elicit time preferences of nearly 1,000 children ages 3-12, who make several inter temporal decisions. To shed light on how such primitives form, we explore various channels that might affect time preferences, from background characteristics to the causal impact of an early schooling program that we developed and operated. Our results suggest that time preferences evolve substantially during this period with younger children displaying more impatience than older children. We also find a strong association with race: black children, relative to white or Hispanic children, are more impatient. Interestingly, parents of black children are also much more impatient than parents of white and Hispanic children. Finally, assignment to different schooling opportunities is not significantly associated with child time preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • James Andreoni & Michael Kuhn & John List & Anya Samek & Charles Sprenger, 2017. "Field experiments on the development of time preferences," Artefactual Field Experiments 00615, The Field Experiments Website.
  • Handle: RePEc:feb:artefa:00615
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Matthias Sutter & Martin G. Kocher & Daniela Glätzle-Rützler & Stefan T. Trautmann, 2013. "Impatience and Uncertainty: Experimental Decisions Predict Adolescents' Field Behavior," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(1), pages 510-531, February.
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    1. Field experiments on the development of time preferences
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-03-20 13:36:26

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    Cited by:

    1. Brenøe, Anne Ardila & Epper, Thomas, 2019. "Parenting Values Moderate the Intergenerational Transmission of Time Preferences," Economics Working Paper Series 1917, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    2. Chien-Yu Lai & John List & Anya Samek, 2020. "Got Milk? Using Nudges to Reduce Consumption of Added Sugar," Natural Field Experiments 00688, The Field Experiments Website.

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