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Can we teach civic attitudes?

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  • Daniel Miles

Abstract

There is a large amount of evidence that shows higher levels of schooling are associated with a substantive increase in civic engagement. We empirically discuss this issue using Spanish data. In order to identify the existence of a possible causal link between schooling and civic attitudes, we use the discontinuity between compulsory schooling and minimum working age introduced in the 1976 law of employment regulation. We find that education has no significant causal effect on citizenship outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Miles, "undated". "Can we teach civic attitudes?," Studies on the Spanish Economy 225, FEDEA.
  • Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaeee:225
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Milligan, Kevin & Moretti, Enrico & Oreopoulos, Philip, 2004. "Does education improve citizenship? Evidence from the United States and the United Kingdom," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1667-1695, August.
    2. Kling, Jeffrey R, 2001. "Interpreting Instrumental Variables Estimates of the Returns to Schooling," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(3), pages 358-364, July.
    3. Daron Acemoglu & Joshua Angrist, 2001. "How Large are Human-Capital Externalities? Evidence from Compulsory-Schooling Laws," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2000, Volume 15, pages 9-74 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Joshua D. Angrist, 2004. "Treatment effect heterogeneity in theory and practice," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(494), pages 52-83, March.
    5. Dee, Thomas S., 2004. "Are there civic returns to education?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1697-1720, August.
    6. Arnaud Chevalier, 2004. "Parental Education and Childs Education: A Natural Experiment," CEE Discussion Papers 0040, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    7. Durston, John, 1999. "Construyendo capital social comunitario," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), December.
    8. Lance Lochner & Enrico Moretti, 2004. "The Effect of Education on Crime: Evidence from Prison Inmates, Arrests, and Self-Reports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 155-189, March.
    9. Janet Currie, 2000. "Early Childhood Intervention Programs: What Do We Know?," JCPR Working Papers 169, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    10. Kevin Milligan & Enrico Moretti & Philip Oreopoulos, 2003. "Does Education Improve Citizenship? Evidence from the U.S. and the U.K," NBER Working Papers 9584, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. J.D. Angrist & Guido W. Imbens & D.B. Rubin, 1993. "Identification of Causal Effects Using Instrumental Variables," NBER Technical Working Papers 0136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Siedler, 2007. "Schooling and Citizenship: Evidence from Compulsory Schooling Reforms," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 665, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Arnaud Chevalier & Orla Doyle, 2012. "Schooling and voter turnout : is there an American exception?," Working Papers 201213, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Neelesh Gounder & Mahendra Reddy & Biman Chand Prasad, 2010. "Support for democracy in the Fiji Islands: does schooling matter?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 136-149, January.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • H80 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - General

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