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La reforma de la negociación colectiva en España

  • Samuel Bentolila
  • Juan F. Jimeno

Collective bargaining regulation in Spain was put in place at the beginning of the 1980s and, despite successive labour market reforms, its main ingredients are still intact. In this paper we argue that the Spanish regulation of collective bargaining fits neither the current Spanish economic structure or the needs arising from the new socio-economic, medium run outlook. After describing the main features of the Spanish collective bargaining system, we show that its results, both in micro- and macroeconomics terms, have been relatively poor. We then propose a reform of collective bargaining legislation aiming at better economic performance, and we end by identifying the sources of opposition to this type of reform.

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Paper provided by FEDEA in its series Working Papers with number 2002-03.

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Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2002-03
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  1. Olivier Blanchard & Lawrence F. Katz, 1997. "What We Know and Do Not Know about the Natural Rate of Unemployment," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(1), pages 51-72, Winter.
  2. Lars Calmfors, 2001. "Wages and Wage-Bargaining Institutions in the Emu : A Survey of the Issues," CESifo Working Paper Series 520, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Dolado, Juan J. & Garcia-Serrano, Carlos & Jimeno, Juan F, 2001. "Drawing Lessons From the Boom of Temporary Jobs in Spain," CEPR Discussion Papers 2884, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Lars Calmfors, 1993. "Centralisation of Wage Bargaining and Macroeconomic Performance: A Survey," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 131, OECD Publishing.
  5. Olympia Bover & Pilar García-Perea & Pedro Portugal, 2000. "Labour market outliers: Lessons from Portugal and Spain," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 15(31), pages 379-428, October.
  6. Xavier Raurich & Hector Sala & Valeri Sorolla, 2002. "Employment and Public Capital in Spain," Working Papers wp0204-1, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
  7. Salvador Barrios & Sophia Dimelis & Helen Louri & Eric Strobl, 2004. "Efficiency spillovers from foreign direct investment in the EU periphery: A comparative study of Greece, Ireland, and Spain," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 140(4), pages 688-705, December.
  8. Dolado, Juan J. & Felgueroso, Florentino & Jimeno, Juan F., 1997. "The effects of minimum bargained wages on earnings: Evidence from Spain," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 713-721, April.
  9. Blanchard, Olivier & Wolfers, Justin, 2000. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages C1-33, March.
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