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Can the Theory of Motivation Explain Migration Decisions?

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Abstract

According to Abraham Maslow's motivational theory, human action is motivated by five groups of human needs. The model introduced in this paper exploits Maslow's theory to explain migration flows between regions. In the model, movement from one place to another influences migrant's utility through three various ways. First, through change in wage caused by different wage levels in each location. Second, through changes in utility connected with individuals safety needs and finally, through disarrangement of individual's social networks. When safety and social needs are added to the model, equilibria arise in which wage differential between regions persists.

Suggested Citation

  • Natálie Reichlová, 2005. "Can the Theory of Motivation Explain Migration Decisions?," Working Papers IES 97, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:wpaper:wp097
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    1. Bauer, Thomas K. & Epstein, Gil S. & Gang, Ira N., 2002. "Herd Effects or Migration Networks? The Location Choice of Mexican Immigrants in the U.S," IZA Discussion Papers 551, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    5. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2004. "Migration and regional adjustment to asymmetric shocks in transition economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 230-247, June.
    6. Michael Toney, 1978. "The simultaneous examination of economic and social factors in destination selection: Employing objective and subjective measures," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 15(2), pages 205-212, May.
    7. Kraus, Margit & Schwager, Robert, 2000. "EU enlargement and immigration," ZEW Discussion Papers 00-09, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    8. Michael Toney, 1976. "Length of residence, social ties, and economic opportunities," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 13(3), pages 297-309, August.
    9. Axel Heitmueller, 2006. "Coordination Failures In Network Migration," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 74(6), pages 701-710, December.
    10. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
    11. Bauer, Thomas K. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 1999. "Report No. 3: Assessment of Possible Migration Pressure and its Labour Market Impact Following EU Enlargement to Central and Eastern Europe," IZA Research Reports 3, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Keywords

    agent-based modeling; decision making; migration; motivation; networks;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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