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Assessing the empirical relevance of Walrasian labor frictions to business cycle fluctuations

Author

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  • Joao Madeira

    (Department of Economics, University of Exeter)

Abstract

This paper describes and estimates (with a Bayesian likelihood approach) an otherwise standard dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model, with both sticky prices and wages, augmented with several labor market rigidities (of a Walrasian nature), namely: indivisible labor, predetermined straight time employment numbers (in which case, firms adjust overtime employment to respond to unexpected shocks), hiring expenses and convex adjustment costs. The results show all these frictions to be empirically important. Labor frictions are shown to have important implications to business cycle dynamics and economic policy making. Labor frictions imply TFP shocks have a greater role in accounting for business cycle dynamics. Labor frictions also imply fiscal policy to lead to a greater crowding out of private sector activity and monetary policy to be more e¤ective in achieving disinflation.

Suggested Citation

  • Joao Madeira, 2013. "Assessing the empirical relevance of Walrasian labor frictions to business cycle fluctuations," Discussion Papers 1304, Exeter University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:exe:wpaper:1304
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    File URL: http://people.exeter.ac.uk/cc371/RePEc/dpapers/DP1304.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DSGE; New Keynesian; labor frictions; indivisible labor; labor adjustment costs; overtime; employment; hours.;

    JEL classification:

    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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