IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ess/wpaper/id4975.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Adolescent Fertility in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Effects and Solutions

Author

Listed:
  • Kate McQueston
  • Rachel Silverman
  • Amanda Glassman

Abstract

Adolescent fertility in low- and middle-income countries presents a severe impediment to development and can lead to school dropout, lost productivity, and the intergenerational transmission of poverty. However, there is debate about whether adolescent pregnancy is a problem in and of itself or merely symptomatic of deeper, ingrained disadvantage. To inform policy choices and create a revised research agenda for population and development, this paper aggregates recent quantitative evidence on the socioeconomic consequences of and methods to reduce of teenage pregnancy in the developing world. The review finds variable results for all indicator types with the partial exception of knowledge-based indicators, which increased in response to almost all evaluating interventions, though it is not clear that such interventions necessarily lead to short- or long term-behavior change. [CGD Working paper no. 295]. URL:[http://www.cgdev.org/files/1426175_file_McQueston_Silverman_Glassman_AdolescentFertility_FINAL.pdf].

Suggested Citation

  • Kate McQueston & Rachel Silverman & Amanda Glassman, 2012. "Adolescent Fertility in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Effects and Solutions," Working Papers id:4975, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:4975
    Note: Institutional Papers
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=A201251595341_20.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=4975&fref=repec
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel Klepinger & Shelly Lundberg & Robert Plotnick, 1999. "How Does Adolescent Fertility Affect the Human Capital and Wages of Young Women?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 421-448.
    2. Ruth Levine & Miriam Temin, 2009. "Start With a Girl: A New Agenda for Global Health," Working Papers id:2290, eSocialSciences.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ali,Daniel Ayalew & Deininger,Klaus W. & Kemper,Niels Gerd, 2015. "Pronatal property rights over land and fertility outcomes : evidence from a natural experiment in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7419, The World Bank.
    2. World Bank Group, 2015. "Toward Solutions for Youth Employment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23261, The World Bank.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:4975. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Padma Prakash). General contact details of provider: http://www.esocialsciences.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.