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The Effect of Information Technology on Wage Inequality: Evidence from Indian Manufacturing Sector

  • Vinoj Abraham

A persistent widening of skill based wage inequality in the Indian Organised Manufacturing sector has been reported by many researchers. Two main hypotheses had been tested in developed economies to explain such a phenomenon; an inter-sectoral shift in demand structure and an intra-sectoral shift in production technology. A decomposition of the change in wage share of skilled workers showed that sector bias explained very little of the changes in the share of skilled worker wages while more than 85 percent of the changes occurred within industries, giving support to the argument of changing skill mix within industries, rather than between industries. [Working Paper No. 437]

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Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:3180.

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Date of creation: Nov 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3180
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  1. David Card & Francis Kramarz & Thomas Lemieux, 1995. "Changes in the Relative Structure of Wages and Employment: A Comparison of the United States, Canada, and France," Working Papers 734, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. K.V. Ramaswamy, 2008. "Wage inequality in Indian manufacturing: Is it trade, technology or labour regulations?," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2008-021, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
  3. Donald J. Robbins, 1996. "Evidence on Trade and Wages in the Developing World," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 119, OECD Publishing.
  4. Vinoj Abraham & K.J. Joseph, 2008. "Information Technology and Productivity: Evidence From India's Manufacturing Sector," Working Papers id:1418, eSocialSciences.
  5. Eli Berman & John Bound & Stephen Machin, 1997. "Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence," NBER Working Papers 6166, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Doms, Mark & Dunne, Timothy & Troske, Kenneth R, 1997. "Workers, Wages, and Technology," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(1), pages 253-90, February.
  7. Attanasio, Orazio & Goldberg, Pinelopi & Pavcnik, Nina, 2003. "Trade Reforms and Wage Inequality in Colombia," CEPR Discussion Papers 4023, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Stephen Machin & John Van Reenen, 1998. "Technology And Changes In Skill Structure: Evidence From Seven Oecd Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1215-1244, November.
  9. Acemoglu, D., 1997. "Why Do New Technologies Complement Skills? Directed Technical Change and Wage Inequality," Working papers 97-14, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  10. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2004. "Can Labor Regulation Hinder Economic Performance? Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(1), pages 91-134, February.
  11. Vijay Korra, 2010. "Nature and Characteristics of Seasonal Labour Migration : A Case Study in Mahabubnagar District of Andhra Pradesh," Working Papers id:3182, eSocialSciences.
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