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Restraints On Capital Flows: What Are They?

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  • Ramkishen Rajan

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Abstract

Though there has been much general debate recently about the pros and cons of capital controls, there remains substantial confusion and uncertainty about what exactly is entailed by the term ‘restraining global capital flows’. Popular discussion around this has typically been long on rhetoric and loose generalisations and acutely short on specifics. The aim of this paper is therefore to help refine the debate somewhat by clarifying and systematically categorising the various concepts that have been discussed in policy circles and the popular media. Two specific country experiences with restraining capital flows, viz. Chile and Malaysia are highlighted and discussed, as are the recent and muchpublicised proposals for exchange controls (a la Paul Krugman) and a global currency transactions tax in the forms of a Tobin tax.[Working Paper No. 3]

Suggested Citation

  • Ramkishen Rajan, 2010. "Restraints On Capital Flows: What Are They?," Working Papers id:2553, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2553 Note: Institutional Papers
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Donald J Mathieson & Liliana Rojas-Suárez, 1992. "Liberalization of the Capital Account; Experiences and Issues," IMF Working Papers 92/46, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Eichengreen, Barry & Tobin, James & Wyplosz, Charles, 1995. "Two Cases for Sand in the Wheels of International Finance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(428), pages 162-172, January.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & R. Todd Smith, 1996. "Too much of a good thing: the macroeconomic effects of taxing capital inflows," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 436-464.
    4. Ramkishen S. Rajan, 1998. "The Japanese Economy and Economic Policy in Light of the East Asian Financial Crisis," Macroeconomics Working Papers 22382, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    5. Carmen M. Reinhart & R. Todd Smith, 1996. "Too much of a good thing: the macroeconomic effects of taxing capital inflows," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 436-464.
    6. Owen Evens & Peter J. Quirk, 1995. "Capital Account Convertibility; Review of Experience and Implications for IMF Policies," IMF Occasional Papers 131, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Sebastian Edwards, 1998. "Capital Inflows into Latin America: A Stop-Go Story?," NBER Working Papers 6441, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Helmut Reisen, 1998. "Domestic Causes of Currency Crises: Policy Lessons for Crisis Avoidance," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 136, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ramkishen Rajan, 2010. "Sand in the Wheels of International Finance: Revisiting the Debate in Light of the East Asian Mayhem," Working Papers id:2686, eSocialSciences.
    2. Arun, Thankom Gopinath & Annim, Samuel, 2010. "Economic Governance of MFIs: Inside the Black Box," IZA Discussion Papers 5159, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    debate; capital controls; substantial; global capital flows; generalisations; systematically categorising; Chile; Malaysia; Paul Krugman; Tobin tax;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements

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