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Agricultural Development for Peace

  • Tony Addison

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Agricultural development can contribute significantly to peace by raising incomes and employment, thereby reducing the social frustrations that give rise to violence. Agricultural growth also generates revenues for governments, allowing them to redress the grievances of disadvantaged populations. In this way, growth can be made more equitable, an effect that is enhanced if inequalities in access to natural capital, especially to land, are addressed as well. Agriculture is critical for countries rebuilding from war, especially in making recovery work for the poor. And by raising per capita incomes, agricultural development underpins new democracies. Agricultural development thereby supports political strategies for peace-building and democratization. [Research Paper No. 2005/07 ]

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Date of creation: Jun 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2551
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  1. Santos, Ana Paula & Tschirley, David L., 1999. "The Effects of Maize Trade with Malawi on Price Levels in Mozambique: Implications for Trade and Development Policy," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 55213, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Collier, Paul & Hoeffler, Anke, 1998. "On Economic Causes of Civil War," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(4), pages 563-73, October.
  3. Jayne, Thomas S. & Yamano, Takashi & Weber, Michael T. & Tschirley, David L. & Benfica, Rui M.S. & Chapoto, Antony & Zulu, Ballard & Neven, David, 2002. "Smallholder Income and Land Distribution in Africa: Implications for Poverty Reduction Strategies," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11295, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. Tony Addison, 2009. "Post-Conflict Recovery: Does the Global Economy Work for Peace?," Working Papers id:2299, eSocialSciences.
  5. Anderson, Kym, 2004. "The challenge of reducing subsidies and trade barriers," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3415, The World Bank.
  6. Easterly, William, 2005. "What did structural adjustment adjust?: The association of policies and growth with repeated IMF and World Bank adjustment loans," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 1-22, February.
  7. Azam, Jean-Paul, 1995. " How to Pay for the Peace? A Theoretical Framework with References to African Countries," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 83(1-2), pages 173-84, April.
  8. Ndikumana, Leonce, 2001. "Fiscal Policy, Conflict, and Reconstruction in Burundi and Rwanda," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  9. Verwimp, Philip, 2003. "The political economy of coffee, dictatorship, and genocide," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 161-181, June.
  10. Atkinson, A. B. (ed.), 2004. "New Sources of Development Finance," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199278565, March.
  11. S. Mansoob Murshed & Scott Gates, 2005. "Spatial-Horizontal Inequality and the Maoist Insurgency in Nepal," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(1), pages 121-134, 02.
  12. Tschirley, David L. & Santos, Ana Paula, 1999. "The Effects of Maize Trade with Malawi on Price Levels in Mozambique: Implications for Trade and Development Policy," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56032, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  13. Tony Addison & S. Mansoob Murshed, 2003. "UNU|WIDER Special issue on conflict. Explaining violent conflict: going beyond greed versus grievance," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 391-396.
  14. David De Ferranti & Guillermo E. Perry & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Michael Walton, 2004. "Inequality in Latin America : Breaking with History?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15009.
  15. Tony Addison & Liisa Laakso, 2003. "The political economy of Zimbabwe's descent into conflict," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 457-470.
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