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Is inclusive development a sustainable development? : A political economic perspective

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  • Pushparaj, Soundararajan

Abstract

A major development policy challenge in the contemporary economic policy discourse is to sustain the development momentum. Prevailing political economic realities influence the economic thinking to accommodate the political compulsions. The inclusive development is one such development strategy. Inclusive development is not a mere political pragmatism but a sensible development strategy. This paper discusses the relevance of distributive justice in relation to civil disturbance across and within national boundaries in the context of sustainable development. This paper argues that the inclusive development guarantees the sustainable development. Further, argues for the revival of welfare state for sustainable development.

Suggested Citation

  • Pushparaj, Soundararajan, 2013. "Is inclusive development a sustainable development? : A political economic perspective," MPRA Paper 43966, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:43966
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tony Addison, 2005. "Agricultural Development for Peace," WIDER Working Paper Series RP2005-07, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Edward Miguel & Shanker Satyanath & Ernest Sergenti, 2004. "Economic Shocks and Civil Conflict: An Instrumental Variables Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(4), pages 725-753, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sustainable Development; Inclusion; Inequality; Distributive Justice; Civil unrest;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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