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OECD Agricultural Trade Reforms Impact On India's Prces and Producer's Welfare

  • Surabhi Mittal


The welfare of the producers are analysed with the main focus on small farmers. The analysis presented in the paper is an approximation of the general equilibrium analysis. The four parts of this approximation are: first, the estimation of the world price effect of removal of OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) distortions; second, estimation of the effects of changes in world prices on domestic prices through a price transmission model; third, estimation of the impact on domestic production through a supply response model; and, four, the estimation of changes in supply and welfare on the poor small farmers [WP No.195].

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Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:1072.

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Date of creation: Jul 2007
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Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:1072
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  1. Anderson, Kym & Valenzuela, Ernesto, 2005. "Do Global Trade Distortions Still Harm Developing Country Farmers?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5337, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Dimaranan, Betina V. & Hertel, Thomas W. & Keeney, Roman, 2003. "OECD Domestic Support and the Developing Countries," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22000, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Baffes, John, 2004. "Cotton : Market setting, trade policies, and issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3218, The World Bank.
  4. Tongeren, Frank van & Meijl, Hans van & Surry, Yves, 2001. "Global models applied to agricultural and trade policies: a review and assessment," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 26(2), November.
  5. L. Alan Winters & Neil McCulloch & Andrew McKay, 2004. "Trade Liberalization and Poverty: The Evidence So Far," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(1), pages 72-115, March.
  6. Thomas W. Hertel & Maros Ivanic & Paul V. Preckel & John A. L. Cranfield, 2004. "The Earnings Effects of Multilateral Trade Liberalization: Implications for Poverty," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(2), pages 205-236.
  7. J K Sachdeva, 2003. "Indian Domestic Prices And Export Of Agricultural Commodities," International Trade 0311005, EconWPA.
  8. Ashok Gulati, 2002. "Indian Agriculture in a Globalizing World," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(3), pages 754-761.
  9. Dimaranan, Betina & Hertel, Thomas & Keeney, Roman, 2003. "OECD Domestic Support and Developing Countries," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  10. Burfisher, Mary E., 2001. "The Road Ahead: Agricultural Policy Reform In The Wto -- Summary Report," Agricultural Economics Reports 34067, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  11. Bernard Hoekman & Francis Ng & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2004. "Agricultural Tariffs or Subsidies: Which Are More Important for Developing Economies?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(2), pages 175-204.
  12. Koo, Won W. & Taylor, Richard D. & Mattson, Jeremy W., 2003. "Impacts Of The U.S.-Central America Free Trade Agreement On The U.S. Sugar Industry," Special Reports 23069, North Dakota State University, Center for Agricultural Policy and Trade Studies.
  13. Hertel, Thomas W. & Maros Ivanic & Paul Preckel & John Cranfield, 2004. "The Earnings Effects of Multilateral Trade Liberalization: Implications for Poverty in Developing Countries," GTAP Working Papers 1208, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  14. Schmitz, Andrew & Schmitz, Troy G. & Seale, James L., Jr., 2003. "Ethanol from Sugar: The Case of Hidden Sugar Subsidies in Brazil," Policy Briefs 15679, University of Florida, International Agricultural Trade and Policy Center.
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