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Consumer heterogeneity evolving from social group dynamics. Latent class analyses of German footwear consumption 1980-1991

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  • A. Frenzel Baudisch

Abstract

Boundedly rational consumers rely on their social environment as a source of information. Drawing upon psychological theories about social comparison processes, we hypothesize that social reference groups underlie market segments. New reference groups can emerge from social comparison processes, leading to the establishment of new submarkets and the evolution of aggregate consumer heterogeneity. These propositions are tested with series of cross-sectional surveys on footwear consumption of German men between 1980 and 1991. Using latent class models, we describe the emergence of the submarket for athletic shoes as a function of the appearance and establishment of a new social consumer group.

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  • A. Frenzel Baudisch, 2006. "Consumer heterogeneity evolving from social group dynamics. Latent class analyses of German footwear consumption 1980-1991," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2006-04, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  • Handle: RePEc:esi:evopap:2006-04
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    1. Bhatnagar, Amit & Ghose, Sanjoy, 2004. "A latent class segmentation analysis of e-shoppers," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 57(7), pages 758-767, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fombelle, Paul W. & Sirianni, Nancy J. & Goldstein, Noah J. & Cialdini, Robert B., 2015. "Let them all eat cake: Providing VIP services without the cost of exclusion for non-VIP customers," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(9), pages 1987-1996.
    2. Andreas Chai, 2017. "Tackling Keynes’ question: a look back on 15 years of Learning To Consume," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 251-271, April.
    3. Vanessa OLTRA & Maïder SAINT JEAN, 2009. "Environmental Innovations and Industrial Dynamics (In French)," Cahiers du GREThA 2009-22, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    4. Desai, Kalpesh Kaushik & Trivedi, Minakshi, 2014. "Do consumer perceptions matter in measuring choice variety and variety seeking?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 2786-2792.

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