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Child support and non-resident fathers' contact with their children

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  • Ermisch, John

Abstract

The paper presents a theoretical model of a non-resident father’s child support and contact with his child, which combines the public good treatment of child-expenditure with “trade†in father-child contact-time. The model provides predictions concerning the effects of father’s income and binding child support orders on contact. Using new data from the British Household Panel Survey on frequency of contact of non-resident fathers with their dependent children, there is evidence that, among middle-income fathers, higher father’s income increases contact with his children. In the context of the theory, this suggests that setting a higher binding child support order would reduce father’s contact for these fathers.

Suggested Citation

  • Ermisch, John, 2006. "Child support and non-resident fathers' contact with their children," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-14, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2006-14
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2006-14.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Flinn, Christopher J, 2000. "Modes of Interaction between Divorced Parents," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 41(3), pages 545-578, August.
    2. Del Boca, Daniela & Flinn, Christopher J, 1995. "Rationalizing Child-Support Decisions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1241-1262, December.
    3. Weiss, Yoram & Willis, Robert J, 1993. "Transfers among Divorced Couples: Evidence and Interpretation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(4), pages 629-679, October.
    4. Daniela Del Boca & Rocio Ribero, 2003. "Visitations and Transfers After Divorce," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 187-204, September.
    5. Chiappori, Pierre-Andre, 1992. "Collective Labor Supply and Welfare," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(3), pages 437-467, June.
    6. Weiss, Yoram & Willis, Robert J, 1985. "Children as Collective Goods and Divorce Settlements," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(3), pages 268-292, July.
    7. Del Boca, Daniela & Ribero, Rocio, 1998. "Transfers in non-intact households," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 469-478, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Erdal Tekin, 2014. "Fathers and youths’ delinquent behavior," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 327-358, June.
    2. Bellido, Héctor & Molina, José Alberto & Solaz, Anne & Stancanelli, Elena, 2016. "Do children of the first marriage deter divorce?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 15-31.
    3. Cécile Bourreau-Dubois & Myriam Doriat-Duban & Jean-Claude Ray, 2014. "Child support order: how do judges decide without guidelines? Evidence from France," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 431-452, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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