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Structural Labor Market Transitions and Wage Dispersion in Egypt and Jordan

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  • Shaimaa Yassin

    (University of Paris1 Pantheon-Sorbonne (CES) & Paris School of Economics (PSE))

Abstract

In this paper we determine the feasibility of using data from the Egyptian Labor Market Panel Survey of 2006 and the Jordanian Labor Market Panel Survey of 2010 (ELMPS06 JLMPS10) to estimate the Burdett-Mortensen job search model. The data contains sufficient information on wages, labor force states, durations, and transitions to generate estimates of the model’s structural transition parameters which eventually enable us to explain the persistent high unemployment rates in the region. By extracting different 10-year employment panels for Egypt and Jordan from the available cross-sectional datasets, results indicate that arrival rates of offers for workers are generally higher when unemployed than when employed. When a worker is already employed, the arrival rates of offers for highly educated workers tend to be higher than their uneducated peers. We therefore find that they consequently move faster up the job ladder. Both countries have extremely low job destruction rates. When comparing the two MENA countries, Egypt’s labor market tends to be much more rigid than its Jordanian peer, where extremely higher search frictions force labor market entrants and on-search workers to accept what they are offered. We therefore observe a peculiar high monopsonistic power exerted by the employers. Although, we were able to calculate a firm-specific productivity distribution, we choose to focus on the supply side of the equilibrium job search model. We therefore study labor market differentials across the different educational groups in Egypt and Jordan, showing that the wide variation in frictional transition parameters across these groups helps to explain persistent unemployment and wage differentials especially among the very high-educated youth. Fit analysis tests and policy implications are performed based on the obtained results. The paper is a preliminary endeavor to explore the dynamics of the MENA region’s labor markets (particularly Egypt and Jordan) and test for their extent of rigidity.

Suggested Citation

  • Shaimaa Yassin, 2013. "Structural Labor Market Transitions and Wage Dispersion in Egypt and Jordan," Working Papers 753, Economic Research Forum, revised May 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:753
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fallah, Belal & Krafft, Caroline & Wahba, Jackline, 2019. "The impact of refugees on employment and wages in Jordan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 203-216.
    2. Ragui Assaad & Rana Hendy & Moundir Lassassi & Shaimaa Yassin, 2020. "Explaining the MENA paradox: Rising educational attainment yet stagnant female labor force participation," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 43(28), pages 817-850.
    3. Caroline Krafft & Ragui Assaad, 2018. "Do More Productive Firms Pay Workers More? Evidence from Egypt," Working Papers 1222, Economic Research Forum, revised 18 Sep 2018.
    4. Hanan Morsy & Antoine Levy, 2020. "Growing without changing: A tale of Egypt's weak productivity growth," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 32(3), pages 271-287, September.
    5. Shaimaa Yassin, 2014. "Job Accession, Separation and Mobility in the Egyptian Labor Market Over the Past Decade," Working Papers 881, Economic Research Forum, revised Nov 2014.
    6. François Langot & Shaimaa Yassin, 2015. "Reforming Employment Protection in Egypt: An Evaluation Based on Transition Models with Measurement Errors," Working Papers 918, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2015.

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