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Ethnic Discrimination in the Turkish Labor Market: Evidence From Survey and Field Data

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  • Binnur Balkan

    (Stockholm School of Economics)

  • Seyit Mümin Cilasun

Abstract

The labor market consequences of ethnic conflict between Kurds and Turks in Turkey are not examined in detail mainly due to data restrictions. In this paper, we try to fill this gap in the literature by providing both survey and correspondence audit evidence of ethnic discrimination in the Turkish labor market against Kurdish minority. First, we show that Kurds have lower educational attainment, higher unemployment rate, and longer unemployment spells. Then, we conduct a correspondence audit and find that the Kurdish applicants receive fewer callbacks than the Turkish applicants although their resumes get similar attention at the earlier stages. When we consider the gender dimension, we see no differential treatment of Kurdish males and Turkish males, but for each callback a Kurdish woman receives, a Turkish woman receives 2.5 callbacks. Hence, we conclude that differential treatment by ethnicity might be a feature of the Turkish labor market, especially for females.

Suggested Citation

  • Binnur Balkan & Seyit Mümin Cilasun, 2018. "Ethnic Discrimination in the Turkish Labor Market: Evidence From Survey and Field Data," Working Papers 1197, Economic Research Forum, revised 24 May 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:1197
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    References listed on IDEAS

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