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¿Quiénes son los NiNis en México?

Author

Listed:
  • Eva O. Arceo Gómez

    () (Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas)

  • Raymundo M. Campos Vázquez

    () (El Colegio de México)

Abstract

El objetivo del presente trabajo es caracterizar a la población entre las edades de 15 a 29 años de edad en México que no estudia y no trabaja (NiNi). Utilizamos los Censos de Población de 1990, 2000 y 2010, la ENIGH para el periodo 1992‐2010 y la ENOE para el periodo 2005‐2010. Encontramos que la proporción de NiNis en la población ha disminuido para el periodo 1990‐2010 utilizando tanto el Censo como la ENIGH. Sin embargo, existen diferencias notables por sexo y para los últimos 10 años. Con la reciente crisis económica de 2008 se observa un repunte en la proporción de ser NiNi para hombres para el periodo 2000‐2010 el cual puede ser observado con todos los datos analizados (ENIGH, ENOE y Censos). Las tres muestras utilizadas, ENIGH, ENOE y Censo, son consistentes entre sí. El porcentaje de NiNis en 2010 es de 28.9 por ciento (8.6 millones) entre los jóvenes de 15 a 29 años de edad, y para los hombres en el sector urbano el porcentaje de NiNis es de 13.3 por ciento (1.5 millones). El porcentaje de NiNis mujeres disminuye para el periodo debido a incrementos en la oferta laboral y en la asistencia escolar. Encontramos que los principales determinantes de ser NiNi se encuentran la educación del individuo y el ingreso del hogar para el caso de hombres, y para las mujeres su decisión de dedicarse a quehaceres domésticos.

Suggested Citation

  • Eva O. Arceo Gómez & Raymundo M. Campos Vázquez, 2011. "¿Quiénes son los NiNis en México?," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2011-08, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
  • Handle: RePEc:emx:ceedoc:2011-08
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    File URL: http://cee.colmex.mx/documentos/documentos-de-trabajo/2011/dt20118.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Raymundo M. Campos-Vazquez, 2013. "Pobreza y desigualdad en México: identificación y diagnóstico," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2013-08, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    jóvenes; México; NiNis; empleo;

    JEL classification:

    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J49 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Other
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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