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Asymmetric Information and Inefficient Regulation of Firms Under the Threat of Revolution

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Listed:
  • Paul Maarek

    () (THEMA, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise and THEMA)

  • Michael Dorsch

    () (The American University of Paris)

  • Karl Dunz

    () (The American University of Paris)

Abstract

This paper considers the role of asymmetric information in a political agency theory of autocratic economic policy-making. Within the context of a static game, we analyze the strategic interaction between a self-interested elite ruling class, who may extract rent ineciently through hidden regulations, and an imperfectly informed disenfranchised class, who may choose to revolt. In various models, we identify the Perfect Bayesian Equilibrium (PBE), which we describe in terms of the economy's level of development potential. One model has two-sided uncertainty and a cost of regulation. This model has a PBE such below a threshold development level the elite chose inefficient regulation and above the threshold development level the elite chose the efficient policy. A further extension where the elite own assets allows for a voluntarily transition to democracy.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Maarek & Michael Dorsch & Karl Dunz, 2012. "Asymmetric Information and Inefficient Regulation of Firms Under the Threat of Revolution," THEMA Working Papers 2012-42, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  • Handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2012-42
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Simeon Djankov & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2002. "The Regulation of Entry," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 1-37.
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    5. Lohmann, Susanne, 1994. "Information Aggregation through Costly Political Action," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 518-530, June.
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    7. Daron Acemoglu, 2010. "Institutions, Factor Prices, and Taxation: Virtues of Strong States?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 115-119, May.
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    14. Paul Maarek & Michael Dorsch, 2012. "Inefficient Predation, Information, and Contagious Institutional Change," THEMA Working Papers 2012-32, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    15. Paul Maarek & Michael Dorsch & Karl Dunz, 2012. "Macro Shocks, Regulatory Quality and Costly Political Action," THEMA Working Papers 2012-41, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Maarek & Michael Dorsch & Karl Dunz, 2012. "Macro Shocks, Regulatory Quality and Costly Political Action," THEMA Working Papers 2012-41, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political transition; Revolution; Asymmetric information; Perfect Bayesian equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • P48 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Political Economy; Legal Institutions; Property Rights; Natural Resources; Energy; Environment; Regional Studies

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