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Upgrading and niche usage of PC operating systems

  • Tobias Kretschmer

Microsoft has been dominating the market for PC operating systems (OS) for the last two decades. This paper analyzes the decision of firms to standardize on the mainstream OS family and assesses whether upgrading to the latest version within the MS family is a substitute for using niche OS. We address the following questions: 1) How likely is a firm to standardize on the Microsoft family? 2) How quickly will a firm upgrade to a new version of the mainstream system? 3) Which niche operating system is a firm likely to use, if any? We find that upgrading and niche usage seem to be substitutes to some extent, but that larger and more IT-intensive firms will rather use niche systems than upgrade to the latest Windows version.

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File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/802/
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Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library in its series LSE Research Online Documents on Economics with number 802.

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Date of creation: Nov 2004
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Publication status: Published in International Journal of Industrial Organization, November, 2004, 22(8-9), pp. 1155-1182. ISSN: 0167-7187
Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:802
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