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Borders and Nominal Exchange Rates in Risk-Sharing

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  • Michael B. Devereux
  • Viktoria V. Hnatkovska

Abstract

Models of risk-sharing predict that relative consumption growth rates across locations should be positively related to real exchange rate growth rates across the same areas. We investigate this hypothesis using a new multi-country and multi-regional data set. Within countries, we find evidence for risk-sharing: episodes of high relative regional consumption growth are associated with regional real exchange rate depreciation. Across countries however, the association is reversed: relative consumption and real exchange rates are negatively correlated. We define this reversal as a border effect and show that it accounts for 53 percent of the deviations from full risk-sharing. Since crossborder real exchange rates involve different currencies, it is natural to ask how much of the border effect is accounted for by movements in exchange rates? We find that over one-third of the border effect is due to nominal exchange rate fluctuations. We develop a simple open economy model that is consistent with the importance of nominal exchange rate variability in accounting for deviations from cross-country risk-sharing.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael B. Devereux & Viktoria V. Hnatkovska, 2013. "Borders and Nominal Exchange Rates in Risk-Sharing," CAMA Working Papers 2013-37, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:camaaa:2013-37
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    1. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2002. "Sticky Information versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1295-1328.
    2. -, 2000. "Economic survey of United States, 1999," Oficina de la CEPAL en Washington (Estudios e Investigaciones) 28796, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    3. M. Hadzi-Vaskov, 2007. "Does the Nominal Exchange Rate Explain the Backus-Smith Puzzle? Evidence from the Eurozone," Working Papers 07-32, Utrecht School of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mykhaylova Olena & Staveley-O’Carroll James, 2014. "International transmission of productivity shocks with nonzero net foreign debt," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 14(1), pages 1-46, January.
    2. Oleg Itskhoki & Dmitry Mukhin, 2017. "Exchange Rate Disconnect in General Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 23401, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Real exchange rate; risk sharing; border effect; intranational economics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance

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