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On the direct and indirect effects of ICT on SMEs export performance. Evidence from Colombian manufacturing

Author

Listed:
  • Andrés Mauricio Gomez-Sanchez

    (Universidad del Cauca, Colombia.)

  • Juan A. Máñez Castillejo

    (Universidad de Valencia and ERICES, Valencia, España.)

  • Juan Alberto Sanchis-Llopis

    (Universidad de Valencia and ERICES, Valencia, España.)

Abstract

The objective of this document is to explore the effect of ICT on the performance of Colombian manufacturing SMEs in export markets. To our knowledge, this is the first piece of evidence that explores this issue for an emerging economy. In doing so, we include some cutting-edge novelties such as persistence in export intensity; cross effect from imports to exports, and the role of initial conditions problem. We replicate the Tobit II-Heckman model procedure by using a dynamic Generalized Linear Model (GLM) because the export intensity is a proportion and include the inverse Mills ratio to deal with the selection problem. We merge three databases namely The Annual Manufacturing Survey (EAM); the Innovation and Technological Development Survey (EDIT) and the Annual ICT Manufacturing Survey (EAM-TIC); published by the National Administrative Department of Statistics (DANE) in six waves since 2013 to 2018. In general, our main results suggest that the impacts of information technologies on export intensity are always positive, regardless of the ICT analysed. Other results show persistence in exports, cross effects and self-selection in export markets, among others.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrés Mauricio Gomez-Sanchez & Juan A. Máñez Castillejo & Juan Alberto Sanchis-Llopis, 2023. "On the direct and indirect effects of ICT on SMEs export performance. Evidence from Colombian manufacturing," Working Papers 2304, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
  • Handle: RePEc:eec:wpaper:2304
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dale W. Jorgenson & Mun S. Ho & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2008. "A Retrospective Look at the U.S. Productivity Growth Resurgence," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    ICT; Exports; Sunk costs; Cross effects; Empirical Studies of Trade; Emerging economies; Empirical Analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • L96 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Telecommunications
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity

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