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Choosing on Influence

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  • Cuhadaroglu, Tugce

Abstract

Interaction, the act of mutual influence between two or more individuals, is an essential part of daily life and economic decisions. Yet, micro-foundations of interaction are unexplored. This paper presents a first attempt to this purpose. We study a decision procedure for interacting agents. According to our model, interaction occurs since individuals seek influence for those issues that they cannot solve on their own. Following a choice-theoretic approach, we provide simple properties that aid to detect interacting individuals. In this case, revealed preference analysis not only grants the underlying preferences but also the influence acquired. Our baseline model is based on two interacting individuals, though we extend the analysis to multi-individual environments.

Suggested Citation

  • Cuhadaroglu, Tugce, 2015. "Choosing on Influence," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-59, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  • Handle: RePEc:edn:sirdps:647
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10943/647
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Horan, Sean, 2016. "A simple model of two-stage choice," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 372-406.

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