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Comparing the treatment provided by migrant and nonmigrant health professionals: dentists in Scotland

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  • Chalkley, Martin
  • Wang, Shaolin
  • Tilley, Colin

Abstract

Many OECD countries are increasingly relying on migrants to address shortages of trained health professionals. One key concern is whether migrant health professionals provide equivalent health care. We compare the treatment provided by migrant and non-migrant health professionals using administrative data from the Scottish dental system. A difference-in-differences model is estimated to examine whether migrant dentists respond differently to case mix and individual circumstances as compared with their non-migrant counterparts, and assess the extent to which any differences diminish over time. After controlling for both observed and unobserved differences between individual dentists and the cohort of patients that they treat, we find that migrant dentists have marginally different practice styles, and the variation diminishes over time within two years of practice.

Suggested Citation

  • Chalkley, Martin & Wang, Shaolin & Tilley, Colin, 2011. "Comparing the treatment provided by migrant and nonmigrant health professionals: dentists in Scotland," SIRE Discussion Papers 2011-01, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  • Handle: RePEc:edn:sirdps:243
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10943/243
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martyn Andrews & Thorsten Schank & Richard Upward, 2006. "Practical fixed-effects estimation methods for the three-way error-components model," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(4), pages 461-481, December.
    2. Martin Chalkley & Colin Tilley, 2006. "Treatment intensity and provider remuneration: dentists in the British National Health Service," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 933-946.
    3. Zvi Eckstein & Yoram Weiss, 2004. "On The Wage Growth of Immigrants: Israel, 1990-2000," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(4), pages 665-695, June.
    4. Zorlu, Aslan & Hartog, Joop, 2008. "Employment Assimilation of Immigrants in the Netherlands: Catching Up and the Irrelevance of Education," IZA Discussion Papers 3534, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Cornelißen, Thomas, 2006. "Using Stata for a memory saving fixed effects estimation for the three-way error component model," FDZ Methodenreport 200603_en, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    6. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri, 2005. "Immigrants in the British labour market," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 26(4), pages 423-470, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Grignon & Yaw Owusu & Arthur Sweetman, 2013. "The international migration of health professionals," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 4, pages 75-97 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migrant health professionals; Treatment difference; Assimilation; British NHS; Administrative data;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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