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Labour market performance of immigrants in smaller regions of western countries: some evidence from Atlantic Canada

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  • Akbari, Ather H.

Abstract

Despite recent interest in regionalization of immigration in host nations, most studies have analyzed immigrants’ economic performance by largely focusing on their overall national performance. A regional analysis is necessary because changing geographic distribution of immigrants can affect their economic performance positively or negatively. Present paper focuses on Atlantic Canada whose share in annual Canadian immigrant inflows has been traditionally low, but where recent policy initiatives have resulted in greater attraction and retention of immigrants. Immigrants are found performing better than non-immigrants in regional labour market. The importance of regional analysis of immigrants’ economic performance and contribution in host nations is highlighted.

Suggested Citation

  • Akbari, Ather H., 2010. "Labour market performance of immigrants in smaller regions of western countries: some evidence from Atlantic Canada," MPRA Paper 27941, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27941
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/27941/1/MPRA_paper_27941.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chiswick, Barry R & Miller, Paul W, 1995. "The Endogeneity between Language and Earnings: International Analyses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 246-288, April.
    2. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri, 2005. "Immigrants in the British labour market," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 26(4), pages 423-470, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yujiro Sano & Lisa Kaida & Liam Swiss, 2017. "Earnings of Immigrants in Traditional and Non-Traditional Destinations: A Case Study from Atlantic Canada," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 961-980, August.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigrant attraction and retention; regionalization of immigration; immigration policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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