IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp3534.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Employment Assimilation of Immigrants in the Netherlands: Catching Up and the Irrelevance of Education

Author

Listed:
  • Zorlu, Aslan

    () (University of Amsterdam)

  • Hartog, Joop

    () (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

Using two Dutch labour force surveys, employment assimilation of immigrants is examined. We observe marked differences between immigrants by source country. Non-western immigrants never reach parity with native Dutch. Even second generation immigrants never fully catch up. Caribbean immigrants, who share a colonial history with the Dutch, assimilate relatively quick compared to other non-western immigrants but they still suffer from high unemployment. The study also documents that the quality of jobs is significantly lower for immigrants, especially for those who are at larger cultural distance to Dutch society. Job quality of immigrants increases with the duration of stay but again, does not reach parity with natives. The western immigrants seem to face no considerable difficulties in the Dutch labour market. The most remarkable conclusion is the irrelevance of education for socio-economic position of immigrants once the country of origin has been controlled for.

Suggested Citation

  • Zorlu, Aslan & Hartog, Joop, 2008. "Employment Assimilation of Immigrants in the Netherlands: Catching Up and the Irrelevance of Education," IZA Discussion Papers 3534, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3534
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp3534.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    2. Pieter Bevelander & Helena Skyt Nielsen, 2001. "Declining employment success of immigrant males in Sweden: Observed or unobserved characteristics?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(3), pages 455-471.
    3. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-489, October.
    4. Bijwaard, G.E., 2007. "Modeling migration dynamics of immigrants: the case of the Netherlands," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2007-10, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    5. Alicia Adsera & Barry Chiswick, 2007. "Are there gender and country of origin differences in immigrant labor market outcomes across European destinations?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(3), pages 495-526, July.
    6. Borjas, George J, 1995. "Assimilation and Changes in Cohort Quality Revisited: What Happened to Immigrant Earnings in the 1980s?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 201-245, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Martin Chalkley & Colin Tilley & Shaolin Wang, 2011. "Comparing the treatment provided by migrant and non-migrant health professionals: dentists in Scotland," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 249, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
    2. Zorlu, Aslan, 2011. "Ethnic Disparities in Degree Performance," IZA Discussion Papers 6158, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Aslan Zorlu & Clara Mulder, 2011. "Ethnic Differences in Leaving Home: Timing and Pathways," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 49-72, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    unemployment; employment; immigrants; job quality;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3534. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak). General contact details of provider: http://www.iza.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.