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An assessment of the economic and social impacts of climate change on the energy sector in the Caribbean

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  • Martín, Ramón
  • Gomes, Charmaine
  • Alleyne, Dillon
  • Phillips, Willard

Abstract

The present report assesses the economic and social impacts of climate change on the energy sector in Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Cuba, Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago. In the study, the Artificial Neural Network methodology was employed to model the relationship between climate change and energy demand. The viability of the actions proposed were assessed using cost benefit analyses based on models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of the United States of America.

Suggested Citation

  • Martín, Ramón & Gomes, Charmaine & Alleyne, Dillon & Phillips, Willard, 2013. "An assessment of the economic and social impacts of climate change on the energy sector in the Caribbean," Sede Subregional de la CEPAL para el Caribe (Estudios e Investigaciones) 38280, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
  • Handle: RePEc:ecr:col095:38280
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    File URL: http://repositorio.cepal.org/handle/11362/38280
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bollen, Johannes & Hers, Sebastiaan & van der Zwaan, Bob, 2010. "An integrated assessment of climate change, air pollution, and energy security policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4021-4030, August.
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    7. Lund, Henrik & Kempton, Willett, 2008. "Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 3578-3587, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kuang, Yonghong & Zhang, Yongjun & Zhou, Bin & Li, Canbing & Cao, Yijia & Li, Lijuan & Zeng, Long, 2016. "A review of renewable energy utilization in islands," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 504-513.
    2. Gomes, Charmaine, 2014. "The case of Small Island Developing States of the Caribbean: the challenge of building resilience," Sede Subregional de la CEPAL para el Caribe (Estudios e Investigaciones) 38366, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    3. Henry, Legena & Bridge, Jacqueline & Henderson, Mark & Keleher, Kevin & Barry, Megan & Goodwin, Geoff & Namugayi, Deborah & Morris, Marisha & Oaks, Benjamin & Dalrymple, Odesma & Shrake, Scott & Ota, , 2015. "Key factors around ocean-based power in the Caribbean region, via Trinidad and Tobago," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 160-175.

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