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On the causal dynamics between emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and economic growth

  • Apergis, Nicholas
  • Payne, James E.
  • Menyah, Kojo
  • Wolde-Rufael, Yemane

This paper examines the causal relationship between CO2 emissions, nuclear energy consumption, renewable energy consumption, and economic growth for a group of 19 developed and developing countries for the period 1984-2007 using a panel error correction model. The long-run estimates indicate that there is a statistically significant negative association between nuclear energy consumption and emissions, but a statistically significant positive relationship between emissions and renewable energy consumption. The results from the panel Granger causality tests suggest that in the short-run nuclear energy consumption plays an important role in reducing CO2 emissions whereas renewable energy consumption does not contribute to reductions in emissions. This may be due to the lack of adequate storage technology to overcome intermittent supply problems as a result electricity producers have to rely on emission generating energy sources to meet peak load demand.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 69 (2010)
Issue (Month): 11 (September)
Pages: 2255-2260

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:11:p:2255-2260
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