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The great climate debate

Author

Listed:
  • Sudhakara Reddy, B.
  • Assenza, Gaudenz B.

Abstract

For over two decades, scientific and political communities have debated whether and how to act on climate change. The present paper revisits these debates and synthesizes the longstanding arguments. Firstly, it provides an overview of the development of international climate policy and discusses clashing positions, represented by sceptics and supporters of action on climate change. Secondly, it discusses the market-based measures as a means to increase the win-win opportunities and to attract profit-minded investors to invest in climate change mitigation. Finally, the paper examines whether climate protection policies can yield benefits both for the environment and the economy. A new breed of analysts are identified who are convinced of the climate change problem, while remaining sceptical of the proposed solutions. The paper suggests the integration of climate policies with those of development priorities that are vitally important for developing countries and stresses the need for using sustainable development as a framework for climate change policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Sudhakara Reddy, B. & Assenza, Gaudenz B., 2009. "The great climate debate," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2997-3008, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:8:p:2997-3008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. Long & A. Iles, 1997. "Assessing Climate Change: Co-evolution of Knowledge, Communities, and Methodologies," Working Papers ir97036, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    2. Zhang, ZhongXiang, 2006. "Toward an effective implementation of clean development mechanism projects in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(18), pages 3691-3701, December.
    3. Reddy, B. Sudhakara & Balachandra, P., 2006. "Dynamics of technology shifts in the household sector--implications for clean development mechanism," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(16), pages 2586-2599, November.
    4. Dasgupta, Susmita & Laplante, Benoit & Meisner, Craig & Wheeler, David & Jianping Yan, 2007. "The impact of sea level rise on developing countries : a comparative analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4136, The World Bank.
    5. Marcel Kok & Bert Metz & Jan Verhagen & Sascha Van Rooijen, 2008. "Integrating development and climate policies: national and international benefits," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 103-118, March.
    6. Bert Metz & Marcel Kok, 2008. "Integrating development and climate policies," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 99-102, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Shiyi Chen & Wolfgang Karl Härdle, 2012. "Dynamic Activity Analysis Model Based Win-Win Development Forecasting Under the Environmental Regulation in China," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2012-002, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    2. Chuku Chuku, 2010. "Pursuing an integrated development and climate policy framework in Africa: options for mainstreaming," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 41-52, January.
    3. Chen, Shiyi, 2013. "What is the potential impact of a taxation system reform on carbon abatement and industrial growth in China?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 369-386.
    4. Anita Talberg & Stephen Howes, 2010. "Party Divides: Expertise in and Attitude towards Climate Change among Australian Members of Parliament," CCEP Working Papers 0810, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    5. Kennedy, Matthew & Basu, Biswajit, 2014. "An analysis of the climate change architecture," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 185-193.
    6. Sahbi Farhani, 2015. "Renewable energy consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions: Evidence from selected MENA countries," Working Papers 2015-612, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    7. Farhani, Sahbi & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2014. "What role of renewable and non-renewable electricity consumption and output is needed to initially mitigate CO2 emissions in MENA region?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 80-90.
    8. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:600-:d:95732 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2013. "Economic growth, combustible renewables and waste consumption and emissions in North Africa," MPRA Paper 47765, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Menyah, Kojo & Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2010. "CO2 emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy and economic growth in the US," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 2911-2915, June.
    11. Chen, Ping-Yu & Chen, Sheng-Tung & Hsu, Chia-Sheng & Chen, Chi-Chung, 2016. "Modeling the global relationships among economic growth, energy consumption and CO2 emissions," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 420-431.
    12. repec:eee:renene:v:123:y:2018:i:c:p:36-43 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Howes, Stephen & Talberg, Anita, 2010. "Party divides: expertise in and attitude towards climate change among Australian Members of Parliament," Working Papers 249385, Australian National University, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy.
    14. Yu, Yu & Wang, Derek D. & Li, Shanling & Shi, Qinfen, 2016. "Assessment of U.S. firm-level climate change performance and strategy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 432-443.
    15. van Ruijven, Bas J. & Weitzel, Matthias & den Elzen, Michel G.J. & Hof, Andries F. & van Vuuren, Detlef P. & Peterson, Sonja & Narita, Daiju, 2012. "Emission allowances and mitigation costs of China and India resulting from different effort-sharing approaches," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 116-134.
    16. Mehdi Abbas, 2011. "Carbon border adjustement, trade and climate governance : issues for OPEC economies," Post-Print halshs-00617923, HAL.
    17. Pauline Lacour & Jean-Christophe Simon, 2012. "Quelle intégration des pays en développement dans le régime climatique ? Le Mécanisme pour un Développement Propre en Asie," Post-Print halshs-00763231, HAL.
    18. Apergis, Nicholas & Payne, James E. & Menyah, Kojo & Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2010. "On the causal dynamics between emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and economic growth," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(11), pages 2255-2260, September.

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    Keywords

    Climate Debate Development;

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