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Duration Dependence in Stock Prices: An Analysis of Bull and Bear Markets

  • Asger Lunde

    (Aalborg University)

  • Allan Timmermann

    (University of California)

This paper investigates the presence of bull and bear market states in stock price dynamics. A new definition of bull and bear market states based on sequences of stopping times tracing local peaks and troughs in stock prices is proposed. Duration dependence in stock prices is investigated through posterior mode estimates of the hazard function in bull and bear markets. We find that the longer a bull market has lasted, the lower is the probability that it will come to a termination. In contrast, the longer a bear market has lasted, the higher is its termination probability. Interest rates are also found to have an important effect on cumulated changes in stock prices: increasing interest rates are associated with an increase in bull market hazard rates and a decrease in bear market hazard rates.

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Paper provided by Econometric Society in its series Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers with number 1216.

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Date of creation: 01 Aug 2000
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Handle: RePEc:ecm:wc2000:1216
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  1. Pesaran, M Hashem & Timmermann, Allan, 1995. " Predictability of Stock Returns: Robustness and Economic Significance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1201-28, September.
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  9. Bollerslev, Tim & Ole Mikkelsen, Hans, 1996. "Modeling and pricing long memory in stock market volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 151-184, July.
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  12. Glosten, Lawrence R & Jagannathan, Ravi & Runkle, David E, 1993. " On the Relation between the Expected Value and the Volatility of the Nominal Excess Return on Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(5), pages 1779-1801, December.
  13. Sueyoshi, Glenn T, 1995. "A Class of Binary Response Models for Grouped Duration Data," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(4), pages 411-31, Oct.-Dec..
  14. Jacob Boudouk & Matthew Richardson, 1994. "The Statistics Of Long-Horizon Regressions Revisited," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(2), pages 103-119.
  15. J. Michael Durland & Thomas H. McCurdy, 1993. "Duration Dependent Transitions in a Markov Model of U.S. GNP Growth," Working Papers 887, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
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  17. Francis X. Diebold & Glenn Rudebusch & Daniel Sichel, 1993. "Further Evidence on Business-Cycle Duration Dependence," NBER Chapters, in: Business Cycles, Indicators and Forecasting, pages 255-284 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. James M. Poterba & Lawrence H. Summers, 1987. "Mean Reversion in Stock Prices: Evidence and Implications," NBER Working Papers 2343, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. Kim, Moon K. & Zumwalt, J. Kenton, 1979. "An Analysis of Risk in Bull and Bear Markets," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(05), pages 1015-1025, December.
  20. Francis X. Diebold & Glenn D. Rudebusch, 1988. "A nonparametric investigation of duration dependence in the American business cycle," Working Paper Series / Economic Activity Section 90, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  21. Brock, W. & Lakonishok, J. & Lebaron, B., 1991. "Simple Technical Trading Rules And The Stochastic Properties Of Stock Returns," Working papers 90-22, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  22. Allan Timmermann & Halbert White & Ryan Sullivan, 1998. "Data-Snooping, Technical Trading, Rule Performance and the Bootstrap," FMG Discussion Papers dp303, Financial Markets Group.
  23. Fabozzi, Frank J & Francis, Jack Clark, 1977. "Stability Tests for Alphas and Betas over Bull and Bear Market Conditions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1093-99, September.
  24. Maheu, John M & McCurdy, Thomas H, 2000. "Identifying Bull and Bear Markets in Stock Returns," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 18(1), pages 100-112, January.
  25. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-79, June.
  26. Gabriel Perez-Quiros & Allan Timmermann, 2000. "Firm Size and Cyclical Variations in Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(3), pages 1229-1262, 06.
  27. Chauvet, Marcelle & Potter, Simon, 2000. "Coincident and leading indicators of the stock market," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 87-111, May.
  28. Adrian R. Pagan & Kirill A. Sossounov, 2003. "A simple framework for analysing bull and bear markets," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 23-46.
  29. Fama, Eugene F. & French, Kenneth R., 1989. "Business conditions and expected returns on stocks and bonds," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 23-49, November.
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