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Ranking Friends

Author

Listed:
  • Feinberg, Yossi

    (Stanford University)

  • Kets, Willemien

    (Northwestern University)

Abstract

We investigate the scope for cooperation within a community engaged in repeated reciprocal interactions. Players seek the help of others and approach them sequentially according to some fixed order, that is, a ranking profile. We study the ranking profiles that are most effective in sustaining cooperation in equilibrium, that is, profiles that support full cooperation in equilibrium under the largest set of parameters. These are the profiles that spread the costs of helping others equally among the members of the community. We show that, generically, these socially optimal ranking profiles correspond to Latin squares--profiles in which each player appears in a given position exactly once in other players' list. In addition, we study equilibria with bilateral enforcement in which only the victims punish non-cooperating deviators. We show that the Latin squares in which every two players rank each other at the same position can sustain cooperation for the widest range of parameters in this case.

Suggested Citation

  • Feinberg, Yossi & Kets, Willemien, 2012. "Ranking Friends," Research Papers 2127, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:2127
    as

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    File URL: https://gsbapps.stanford.edu/researchpapers/library/RP2127.pdf
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    Other versions of this item:

    • Yossi Feinberg & Willemien Kets, 2012. "Ranking Friends," Discussion Papers 1557, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Takahashi, Satoru, 2010. "Community enforcement when players observe partners' past play," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 145(1), pages 42-62, January.
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    13. Alexander Wolitzky, 2013. "Cooperation with Network Monitoring," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 395-427.
    14. Michihiro Kandori, 1992. "Social Norms and Community Enforcement," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(1), pages 63-80.
    15. Michi Kandori, 2010. "Social Norms and Community Enforcement," Levine's Working Paper Archive 630, David K. Levine.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation

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