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Optimal Inflation with Corporate Taxation and Financial Constraints

Author

Listed:
  • Daria Finocchiaro
  • Giovanni Lombardo
  • Caterina Mendicino
  • Philippe Weil

Abstract

How does inflation affect the investment decisions of financially constrained firms in the presence of corporate taxation? Inflation interacts with corporate taxation via the deductibility of i) capital expenditures and ii) interest payments on debt. Through the first channel, inflation increases firms’ taxable profits and further distorts their investment decisions. Through the second, expected inflation affects the effective real interest rate and stimulates investment. When debt is collateralized, the second effect dominates. Therefore, present a tax-advantage to debt financing, positive long-run inflation enhances welfare by mitigating or even eliminating the investment distortion.

Suggested Citation

  • Daria Finocchiaro & Giovanni Lombardo & Caterina Mendicino & Philippe Weil, 2017. "Optimal Inflation with Corporate Taxation and Financial Constraints," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2017-50, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/262613
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    optimal monetary policy; Friedman rule; credit frictions; tax benefits of debt;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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