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Assessing Benefit-Incidence Results Using Decompositions: The Case of Health Policy in Argentina

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  • Leonardo Gasparini

    (Centro de Estudios Distributivos, Laborales y Sociales (CEDLAS) FCE - UNLP)

Abstract

This paper discusses the use of aggregate and microeconometric decompositions to compare benefit-incidence results over time and across regions. Decompositions are applied to explore changes in targeting in health policies directed to pregnant women and children under 4 in Argentina. The results suggest that although health public programs are pro-poor, incidence changes in the last 5 years have been pro-rich due to two different factors: a substantial reduction in the fertility rate of poor couples, and an increase in the use of public facilities by wealthier households, likely triggered by the economic crisis that Argentina has suffered since 1998.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonardo Gasparini, 2005. "Assessing Benefit-Incidence Results Using Decompositions: The Case of Health Policy in Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0018, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  • Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0018
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    File URL: http://cedlas.econo.unlp.edu.ar/archivos_upload/doc_cedlas18.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pedro Carneiro & Karsten T. Hansen & James J. Heckman, 2002. "Removing the Veil of Ignorance in Assessing the Distributional Impacts of Social Policies," NBER Working Papers 8840, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Walter Sosa Escudero & Leonardo Gasparini, 2000. "A note on the Statistical Significance of Changes in Inequality," Económica, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, vol. 0(1), pages 111-122, January-J.
    3. Deaton, A. & Zaidi, S., 1999. "Guidelines for Constructing Consumption Aggregates for Welfare Analysis," Papers 192, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Development Studies.
    4. Mills, Jeffrey A & Zandvakili, Sourushe, 1997. "Statistical Inference via Bootstrapping for Measures of Inequality," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(2), pages 133-150, March-Apr.
    5. Angus Deaton & Salman Zaidi, 2002. "Guidelines for Constructing Consumption Aggregates for Welfare Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14101, April.
    6. van de Walle, Dominique, 1998. "Assessing the welfare impacts of public spending," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 365-379, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sebastián Galiani & Leonardo Gasparini, 2012. "El Impacto Distributivo de las Políticas Sociales," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0130, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    2. Ricardo Bebczuk, 2009. "SME Access to Credit in Guatemala and Nicaragua: Challenging Conventional Wisdom with New Evidence," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0080, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    3. World Bank, 2008. "Nicaragua - Poverty Assessment : Volume 3. Background Paper," World Bank Publications - Reports 8101, The World Bank Group.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    protección; informalidad; empleo; América Latina.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • D3 - Microeconomics - - Distribution
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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