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The influence of indigenous status and community indigenous composition on obesity and diabetes among Mexican adults

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  • Stoddard, Pamela
  • Handley, Margaret A.
  • Vargas Bustamante, Arturo
  • Schillinger, Dean

Abstract

In many high-income countries, indigenous populations bear a higher burden of obesity and diabetes than non-indigenous populations. Less is known about these patterns in lower- and middle-income countries. We assessed the hypothesis that obesity and diabetes were less prevalent among indigenous than non-indigenous adults in Mexico, home to the largest indigenous population in Latin America. We investigated socioeconomic explanations for differences. In a related line of inquiry, we examine whether adults in communities with higher versus lower percentages of indigenous residents were buffered against these conditions. We assessed whether differences were partially explained by lower development in higher-indigenous communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Stoddard, Pamela & Handley, Margaret A. & Vargas Bustamante, Arturo & Schillinger, Dean, 2011. "The influence of indigenous status and community indigenous composition on obesity and diabetes among Mexican adults," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(11), pages 1635-1643.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:73:y:2011:i:11:p:1635-1643
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.09.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Damman, Siri & Eide, Wenche Barth & Kuhnlein, Harriet V., 2008. "Indigenous peoples' nutrition transition in a right to food perspective," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 135-155, April.
    2. Smith, Kimberly V. & Goldman, Noreen, 2007. "Socioeconomic differences in health among older adults in Mexico," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(7), pages 1372-1385, October.
    3. Popkin, Barry M., 1999. "Urbanization, Lifestyle Changes and the Nutrition Transition," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 1905-1916, November.
    4. Patrick Royston, 2004. "Multiple imputation of missing values," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 227-241, September.
    5. Briceno-Garmendia, Cecilia & Estache, Antonio & Shafik, Nemat, 2004. "Infrastructure services in developing countries : access, quality, costs and policy reform," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3468, The World Bank.
    6. Bando, Rosangela & López-Calva, Luis F., 2005. "Conditional cash transfers and indigenous people?s health: Is there a differential impact of Progresa between indigenous and non-indigenous households?," EGAP Working Papers 2006-02, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de México.
    7. Angus Deaton & Salman Zaidi, 2002. "Guidelines for Constructing Consumption Aggregates for Welfare Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14101.
    8. Buttenheim, Alison & Goldman, Noreen & Pebley, Anne R. & Wong, Rebeca & Chung, Chang, 2010. "Do Mexican immigrants "import" social gradients in health to the US?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(7), pages 1268-1276, October.
    9. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2004:94:10:1807-1812_6 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. LEVASSEUR Pierre, 2015. "Causal effects of socioeconomic status on central adiposity: Evidence using panel data from urban Mexico," Cahiers du GREThA 2015-09, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.

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