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Human Trafficking, a Shadow of Migration: Evidence from Germany

  • Seo-Young Cho

This paper empirically analyzes the causal relationship between migration and human trafficking inflows into Germany during the period between 2001 and 2010. My results suggest that migrant networks, measured by migrant stocks from a specific source country, increase the illicit, exploitative form of migration - human trafficking - from that respective country. However, the network effect varies across different income levels of source countries. The significant, positive effect of migrant networks decreases as the income level increases, and furthermore the effect is insignificant for high income countries.

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Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Economics of Security Working Paper Series with number 76.

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Length: 30 p.
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diweos:diweos76
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  1. Seo-Young Cho & Axel Dreher & Eric Neumayer, 2012. "Does Legalized Prostitution Increase Human Trafficking?," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 71, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. David Mckenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2004. "Network Effects and the Dynamics of Migration and Inequality: Theory and Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 2004-3, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
  3. William H. Greene, 2009. "Testing Hypotheses About Interaction Terms in Nonlinear Models," Working Papers 09-08, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  4. Randall Akee & Arnab K. Basu & Arjun Bedi & Nancy H. Chau, 2014. "Transnational Trafficking, Law Enforcement, and Victim Protection: A Middleman Trafficker's Perspective," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(2), pages 349 - 386.
  5. Seo-Young Cho, 2012. "Integrating Equality: Globalization, Women's Rights, and Human Trafficking," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 69, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  6. Omar Mahmoud, Toman & Trebesch, Christoph, 2009. "The Economic Drivers of Human Trafficking: Micro-Evidence from Five Eastern European Countries," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Frankfurt a.M. 2009 38, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  7. Niklas Jakobsson & Andreas Kotsadam, 2013. "The law and economics of international sex slavery: prostitution laws and trafficking for sexual exploitation," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 87-107, February.
  8. Epstein, Gil S. & Gang, Ira N., 2010. "Migration and Culture," IZA Discussion Papers 5123, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Andreas Forø Tollefsen & Håvard Strand & Halvard Buhaug, 2012. "PRIO-GRID: A unified spatial data structure," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 49(2), pages 363-374, March.
  10. Akee, Randall K. Q. & Basu, Arnab K. & Chau, Nancy & Khamis, Melanie, 2010. "Ethnic Fragmentation, Conflict, Displaced Persons and Human Trafficking: An Empirical Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 5142, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Pedersen, Peder J. & Pytlikova, Mariola & Smith, Nina, 2008. "Selection and network effects--Migration flows into OECD countries 1990-2000," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1160-1186, October.
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