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Skill Mismatch and Migration in Egypt and Tunisia

Author

Listed:
  • Anda David

    () (PSL, Université Paris Dauphine, LEDa, IRD, UMR DIAL)

  • Christophe Nordman

    () (IRD, UMR 225 DIAL, PSL, Université Paris Dauphine, LEDa)

Abstract

(english) The objective of this paper is to shed light on the issue of skill mismatch in the context of return migration in Egypt and Tunisia. Using data on both return and potential migrants in Egypt and Tunisia, we analyze the skills that migrants acquire before and during migration and the way these skills are used upon return. We find evidence of skill mismatch, especially in Tunisia. The undereducation phenomenon is more prevalent among return migrants, indicating that they make up for their lower education using their migration experience. Finally, we estimate the determinants of skill mismatch on the Egyptian and Tunisian labour markets and find a significant negative effect of return migration on the probability of being undereducated. _________________________________ (français) L'objectif de cet article est d’apporter un éclairage sur la question de l'inadéquation des qualifications dans le cadre de la migration de retour en Egypte et en Tunisie. En utilisant à la fois des données sur les migrants de retour et sur les migrants potentiels en Egypte et en Tunisie, nous analysons les qualifications que les migrants acquièrent avant et pendant la période de migration et la façon dont ces compétences sont utilisées à leur retour. Nos résultats confirment l’existence d’un fort degré d'inadéquation des qualifications, en particulier en Tunisie. Le phénomène de la sous-éducation est plus présent pour les migrants de retour, indiquant qu'ils compensent leur faible niveau d'éducation en utilisant leur expérience migratoire. Enfin, nous examinons les déterminants de l'inadéquation des qualifications sur les marchés du travail égyptien et tunisien et trouvons en effet une corrélation négative et significative de la migration de retour sur la probabilité d'être sous-éduqué.

Suggested Citation

  • Anda David & Christophe Nordman, 2014. "Skill Mismatch and Migration in Egypt and Tunisia," Working Papers DT/2014/05, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
  • Handle: RePEc:dia:wpaper:dt201405
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dustmann, Christian & Fadlon, Itzhak & Weiss, Yoram, 2011. "Return migration, human capital accumulation and the brain drain," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 58-67, May.
    2. Hartog, Joop, 2000. "Over-education and earnings: where are we, where should we go?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 131-147, April.
    3. repec:pit:wpaper:380 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mahuteau, Stephane & Tani, Massimiliano, 2011. "Labour Market Outcomes and Skill Acquisition in the Host Country: North African Migrants Returning Home from the European Union," IZA Discussion Papers 5441, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Fatma El-Hamidi, 2009. "Education-Occupation Mismatch and the Effect on Wages of Egyptian Workers," Working Papers 474, Economic Research Forum, revised Mar 2009.
    6. Manon Domingues Dos Santos & Fabien Postel-Vinay, 2004. "The impact of temporary migration on human capital accumulation and economie development," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 47(1), pages 77-88.
    7. Dieter Verhaest & Eddy Omey, 2006. "Discriminating between alternative measures of over-education," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(18), pages 2113-2120.
    8. Arnaud Chevalier, 2003. "Measuring Over-education," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(279), pages 509-531, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anda David & Mohamed Ali Marouani, 2017. "Migration patterns and labor market outcomes in Tunisia," Working Papers DT/2017/03, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Return migration; skill mismatch; labor market; education; Tunisia and Egypt; Migration de retour; inadéquation des qualifications; marché du travail; éducation; Tunisie et Egypte.;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

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