IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/dem/wpaper/wp-2002-026.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Institutional arrangements and life course outcomes: the interrelations between cohabitation, marriage and first birth in Germany and Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Pau Baizán

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Arnstein Aassve

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Francesco C. Billari

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

We study the link between institutional arrangements and fertility, focusing on how institutions affect the nexus between partnership formation and fertility. We apply simultaneous hazard models to family and fertility survey data for Germany and Sweden. Our results show a significant presence of correlated unobserved factors that affect both partnership formation and the transition to parenthood. We argue that these factors reflect the heterogeneous composition of each population with respect to values and norms. Net of that correlation, the impact of being in a union on first birth is higher in Sweden than in Germany, in particular for cohabitation.

Suggested Citation

  • Pau Baizán & Arnstein Aassve & Francesco C. Billari, 2002. "Institutional arrangements and life course outcomes: the interrelations between cohabitation, marriage and first birth in Germany and Sweden," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-026, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2002-026
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2002-026.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gustafsson, Siv, 1992. "Separate Taxation and Married Women's Labor Supply: A Comparison of West Germany and Sweden," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 5(1), pages 61-85, February.
    2. Keeley, Michael C, 1977. "The Economics of Family Formation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(2), pages 238-250, April.
    3. Pau Baizán Munoz & Arnstein Aassve & Francesco C. Billari, 2001. "Cohabitation, marriage, first birth: the interrelationship of family formation events in Spain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-036, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Lillard, Lee A., 1993. "Simultaneous equations for hazards : Marriage duration and fertility timing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1-2), pages 189-217, March.
    5. Pamela Smock & Wendy Manning, 1997. "Cohabiting partners’ economic circumstances and marriage," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(3), pages 331-341, August.
    6. Leslie Whittington, 1992. "Taxes and the Family: The impact of the tax exemption for dependents on marital fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 29(2), pages 215-226, May.
    7. Michael J. Brien & Lee A. Hillard & Linda Waite, "undated". "Cohabitation, Marriage, and Non-Fertility," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 97-5, Chicago - Population Research Center.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gunnar Andersson & Ann-Zofie Duvander & Karsten Hank, 2004. "Erwerbsstatus und Familienentwicklung in Schweden aus paarbezogener Perspektive," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-006, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Arnstein Aassve & Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Matt Dickson, 2006. "Employment, family union and childbearing decisions in Great Britain," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 781-804.
    3. Hill Kulu, 2004. "Fertility of internal migrants: comparison between Austria and Poland," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-022, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Hill Kulu, 2003. "Migration and fertility: competing hypotheses re-examined," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-035, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. FFF1Francesco NNN1Billari, 2004. "Becoming an Adult in Europe: A Macro(/Micro)-Demographic Perspective," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(2), pages 15-44, April.
    6. Jean-Marie Le Goff, 2002. "Cohabiting unions in France and West Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(18), pages 593-624, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Germany; Sweden; cohabitation; fertility; marriage;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2002-026. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Wilhelm). General contact details of provider: https://www.demogr.mpg.de/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.