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Narratives About Technology-Induced Job Degradation Then and Now

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Abstract

Concerns that technological progress degrades job opportunities have been expressed over much of the last two centuries by both professional economists and the general public. These concerns can be seen in narratives both in scholarly publications and in the news media. Part of the expressed concern about jobs has been about the potential for increased economic inequality. But another part of the concern has been about a perceived decline in job quality in terms of its effects on monotony vs creativity of work, individual sense of identity, power to act independently, and meaning of life. Public policy should take account of both of these concerns, inequality and job quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert J. Shiller, 2019. "Narratives About Technology-Induced Job Degradation Then and Now," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2168, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:2168
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    File URL: https://cowles.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/pub/d21/d2168.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Gouranga Gopal Das & Sugata Marjit & Mausumi Kar, 2019. "Skill, Innovation and Wage Inequality: Can Immigrants be the Trump Card?," CESifo Working Paper Series 7794, CESifo.
    2. Graetz, Georg, 2020. "Technological change and the Swedish labor market," Working Paper Series 2020:19, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. Gouranga Gopal Das & Sugata Marjit, 2018. "Skill, Innovation and Wage Inequality: Can Immigrants be the Trump Card?," CESifo Working Paper Series 7082, CESifo.
    4. Das, Gouranga Gopal & Marjit, Sugata & Kar, Mausumi, 2020. "The Impact of Immigration on Skills, Innovation and Wages: Education Matters more than where People Come from," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 557-582.
    5. Georg Graetz, 2020. "Labor Demand in the Past, Present and Future," CESifo Working Paper Series 8234, CESifo.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor-saving machines; Artificial intelligence; History of thought; Division of labor; Unemployment; Automation; Robotics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • B0 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General
    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment

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